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Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "5x write speed with 1x the performance"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

The M.2 can be a bit faster, and I recently bought both a 1TB SATA SSD drive (for my mom's laptop that can't take M.2) and a 1TB M.2 NVMe. The NVMe was cheaper, and I guess roughly the same reliability.

And sometimes I do have long sequential reads...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Hard drive for games"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Buying multiple SSDs pretty much only makes sense at the >2TB range, so that changes things a bit...

I'd recommend looking into primocache (or possibly AMD's tiering solution) before buying multiple TB of SSDs. One large NVMe caching a huge HDD should cover any gaming situation (changing games would require pulling data off the drive giving you a slow first level load, but any subsequent level loads will be fine). Primocache seems to be favored for this type of thing, but I'm using the AMD system that comes with the motherboard as Steam is more or less automatically backed up (and I just use it for Steam and similar "safe" things).

https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/321254-primocache-vs-hdd (unfortunately this is "primocache vs. HDD", "primocache vs. SSD" is probably the more commonly asked question).

For anything that needs to be backed up, HDDs are still king (of course you still have issues storing it locally), but nearly all the storage games used can be re-downloaded. You may be able to use an old hard drive for backing up the "everything else" issues.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "HDD data cable splitters??"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

No (SATA is a point to point protocol).

You'll need a PCIe board with more SATA connections, and you might wind up using SAS connections and buying SAS-SATA adapter cables. One "quick and dirty" method I used for grabbing two more SATA ports on my motherboard was to buy a PCIe NVMe port: using the NVMe port on my motherboard disabled SATA ports 5-6 (this is an AMD 450B motherboard).

This is commonly discussed over on https://www.reddit.com/r/DataHoarder/

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Nas Home server for games"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

I suspect that if you want a full "NAS box", then building a NAS server makes a lot more sense. XigmaNAS looks like an ideal platform for this (assuming you have at least 8G on the old server) and uses a ZFS filesystem.

If you just want to stick a single disk or so on your home network the "NAS box" would work (although it might not be cheap). You don't need a "NAS Drive" unless you are building a RAID system: the whole point of those is to not timeout in a RAID system. One interesting combination would be an external USB drive (such as the WD 8-10TB easystores) and a Raspberry Pi 4 (USB3 should be good enough not to slow down the drive at all). It won't have much RAM, but it will also be relatively inexpensive and not use much power.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Moving Storage drives"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

Historically, windows doesn't like to boot off old drives onto new systems (linux doesn't care). Moving old storage as "D:" drives or more won't change anything. I suspect that any applications will have to be re-installed (Steam seems to find games and anything else it handles without issue).

This might be rather out of date: I recently updated my computer and was astonished at how much simply "just worked", although pretty much all I do on Windows involves games, typically through Steam.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Phantom Listing 8TB External Drive for 40$?"

  • 2 months ago
  • 1 point

If it was ever sold at that price, it didn't last long.

On the other hand, newegg was selling 6T external (shingled Seagates) for $80 (I had already bought one at that price from Target. I suspect most Targets have sold out at that price), so it isn't quite as unlikely as seen at first glance.

The newegg thing claimed to be a blitz deal "subscriber only, one day only" deal...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU is my weak spot"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

The 2700x will boost higher (which is likely how they eat 40W more). With the 2700 I'd recommend overclocking.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Will a GeForce GTX 560 Ti work as a low end temporary GPU for R7 3700X/Strix X570-I (Mini ITX) Setup"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

One issue I discovered with my trusty 560ti was that it was incapable of driving a 4k monitor.

I doubt a 560ti would be limited by an x4 slot in SLI mode, but I doubt that SLI really is the way forward.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "CPU is my weak spot"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd check the prices first, I think I saw a 2700x recently cheaper than most 2700 available. Also expect to require a bit more cooling for the 2700 as you likely have to overclock it for maximum performance (boosting falls off after a few cores. And quite a bit after the first one).

Disclaimer: I bought a 2700 on Prime Day and haven't bothered to overclock it (I'm still wondering if I can rig up an adapter for my incompatible AIO cooler).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel gave up"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks like IBM might have to (or are they switching to TSMC as well)?

Intel certainly is shipping 10nm for laptops, and as far as I know Intel's priorities are sever>>laptop>>desktop (desktop have the least amount of profit by far), so they might not care enough to do the work to get the frequencies back up (or don't want to ship a sunnycove desktop with frequencies lower than Zen2/3 [which ever is out when 10nm desktop would launch].

I suspect they will finally get this working, but even then 7nm should be getting close (the big issue is likely EUV, which once they get it working for 10nm should solve most of the issues leading to 7nm).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking to build my first gaming pc for $300-$400"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

You might want to look at used/refurbished PCs, possibly adding a SSD or GPU if sufficiently low end. Remember, Intel CPUs have been just barely been creeping up in performance over the last 10 years or so (with significantly more cores in recent chips) so there are some great deals on older machines out there. Just don't buy something likely to die on you right away.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC Build $2,000-$2,500 Budget"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

I'd at least check the various "build guides". Some of the names include "excellent game build" at the $1100 range, "Enthusiast" at the $1500 range, and "magnificent" at the $2400 level. By $2500 they are pretty much looking for places to spend money... https://pcpartpicker.com/guide/

I'd step back a bit and ask what you need.

VR is a big issue, and depending on what headset you choose that could mean up to 2k (x2 per eye) at 90+ fps. I doubt that it requires a 1080ti, but a "game build" will typically spend most of the money in the GPU.

To be honest, the monitor you choose is a great place to start (and head back to and change when you don't like the computer that fits it). What resolution and framerate do you want? Extreme framerates typically pull to Intel builds, or at least require the highest clocked Ryzens. Anything else will work fine with almost any CPU, although I'd recommend at least a 3600 for enough cores/threads.

Resolution x framerate also tells you a lot about how much GPU you will need. And VR wants some significant framerates (unless you are going with a ~$120 hp windows mixed reality special at Microcenter. They are capped at 60fps, but probably not what you want with that budget).

Storage? For the first TB I'd go with NVMe, and the rest with rotating rust (if needed). You probably don't need the HDD, but hoarding old data is a habit of mine.

Memory? I'd go with 16GB, and probably around 3MT/s, unless you have something big in mind other than gaming.

Case/keyboard/mouse/OS - these are pretty much the same in any build, although the bigger budgets might try to buy higher end of most.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which mmo games for rtx 2060 s"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

A lot depends on what you are asking of your GPU.

I tend to assume that high frame rate gaming is all about squeezing the last drops of latency out of the game and knowing where an enemy is as soon as possible (then again, I'm not remotely interested in that). You might be able to increase the framerate as high as you want, but the location of said enemy won't be any more accurate at 144Hz than 60Hz.

You might get more impressive scenery, but I doubt that anything more than 60Hz will matter.

Counterpoint: high-twitch "e-sports" games may involve players focusing on erratically moving targets, while the background moves in completely opposite directions. Such situations are the absolute worst in terms of seeing poor framerate and 60Hz may not be remotely good enough (even if they don't really show the target's position any better).

The point is that you are paying for resolution, scene detail, and framerate. Resolution is typically dictated by your monitor, moving the sliders on the scene detail is your choice [I suspect that they can be maxed out on a 2060 super] and frame rate has the twin issues of your monitors refresh and the latency of the MMO's servers. If you are playing at your monitors resolution and maxed out scenery bars, going far beyond the MMO's server might not buy you anything.

Fortnight type games might need >100Hz Eve and Elite Horizons might only need ~30Hz (but not Elite VR) I doubt WoW and its copycats need more than 60Hz

Comment reply on Forum Topic "New 1080P king?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Presumably the 5500 is cheaper to manufacture than the 580 (not to mention the 590, which only makes sense if you need that last little bit of performance). It probably wasn't that hard to go from the 5700 to the 5500 (going to the 5900 won't be as easy unless they double the width of the memory).

Maybe they are tired of GloFo and the 14/12nm process. Perhaps the TSMC 7nm delays aren't a big deal at all. Shipping 5500 means that they are quite satisfied with TSMC's 7nm and willing to switch to a chip 68% of the size at 7nm over the old 14nm part (I'm guessing it the 7nm part is cheaper to manufacture). I've been a fan of the old 480/580 chip, but it looks like it is being put out to pasture.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Hi everyone! I was looking to upgrade my signature PC with a reliable 6 - 8 TB HDDS mainly for games ,music/video/movies storage."

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Off the wall suggestion: https://slickdeals.net/f/13433917-seagate-backup-plus-hub-6tb-external-hard-drive-black-stel6000100-target-clearance-from-79-98-ymmv?src=SiteSearchV2Algo1

IMPORTANT: this uses "shingle" tech, so writing is very slow. Storing video would be fine, gaming probably not (certainly make sure your saves are on a different drive). Also useful as backup if you go for the WD Black (you'll always want a backup).

Should be "shuckable" (meaning you can simply open the external case and remove the drive itself), although that won't help the slow writes.

And this all depends on the drive being discounted and in stock nearby of course. I wouldn't suggest the thing at list price.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "SSD vs HD"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Even for work I'd probably recommend the HDD: the more data you have the more you need a HDD (if not tape). Even if you work entirely on SSD/NVMe, you'll want HDDs for archives and backup.

Unless it is something like >>100-1000TB, in which case tape might begin to make sense.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Best CPU for cooking pancakes"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Did the Pentium 4 have clock throttling? That was always a good one for extra heating. Of course the hot parts shouldn't get any hotter when overclocked: Intel used logic reminiscent of ECL logic which wasn't dependent on clockspeed (which meant it idled hot).

Bulldozer is probably the easiest to source right now. But you might get a decent used big Xeon (which would have been a reasonable temperature when made, but with enough cores it should get pretty hot. Difficulty: I think they are all clock-locked).

I remember Digital doing an Alpha in ECL, but I suspect that was only a research project (possibly I was hearing about the Pegasus). Early (.25um) Itanium prototypes earned the name "smoking brick of death", if you somehow acquired one of these it would be ideal (something like 400W).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Reasonal upgrade"

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

Current nvidia cards should work with freesync (there's some issue with which are fully supported, you might want to check this specific monitor), so that monitor should work fine with either a 1660 or 1660 ti. Bumping up to those levels are unlikely to be limited by the 75Hz frequency of the monitor, and they seem pretty expensive for the limited bump.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Predictions for next year's Nvidia cards?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Porting a chip from TSMC's 12nm to Samsung's? 7+nm is hardly a simple "refresh". You might still be able to call the thing "Turing", but it will hardly be a simple refresh.

Every AMD card sold is a lost sale for Nvidia (although thanks to AMD's low performance, some of those lost sales might have been used 1080s or similar). Vega7 was sold at cost/or a loss, they weren't making more than they had to. There don't seem to be such supply issues for Navi: if you want one go buy one (and forum users seem to be doing just that). Thanks to the mining market, Vega56/64 barely had to compete with nvidia: if the coins they minted were worth more than the card, the card would sell regardless of how "competitive" it was.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "upgrade or build a new pc? 800$ budget"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

4 cores (with HT)@ 3.4GHz (with 3.9GHz turbo) sounds pretty good these days. Maybe not what you'd buy new, but the improvements will be pretty hard to see. 16GB - that's fine

Note that Microsoft doesn't allow you to move Windows to annother motherboard and since they want to push Win10 on everybody convincing them that this is a "repair" might be more difficult than earlier. Ask others if they've managed to get win7 moved, but keeping your motherboard means you can always keep win7.

Storage: are you running SSDs? This would be a much bigger improvement than anything in the CPU department. Note that adding a NVMe wouldn't be all that effective as you only have PCIe@1 lane slots: no way to use a 4 lane NVMe card.

Video card: GTX1050 is a solid if low power card. You can go higher, but is your monitor capable of more than 1080@60Hz? There's no point in pushing more pixels if your monitor can't display them. Remember that monitors and video cards have to work together, any "bottlenecking" about video cards and CPUs almost always involves a misunderstanding about what is going on.

I just feel that getting a better CPU+motherboard+RAM is going to eat up way too much of an $800 budget, especially if you want to upgrade the GPU+monitor (I tried to start a build but have no idea how you value refresh over visible resolution). But as noted before, $270 should cover the CPU+motherboard+RAM [if and only if you can get win7 to work on the new, improved motherboard. Otherwise you could be adding $100].

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Check over my list?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

My bad. I was too concerned with 16GB I picked the wrong number of modules.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $129.20 @ OutletPC
Motherboard MSI B450M BAZOOKA V2 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $82.89 @ OutletPC
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $64.99 @ Newegg
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $109.98 @ Amazon
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card $169.99 @ Newegg
Case Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L MicroATX Mini Tower Case $42.99 @ Best Buy
Power Supply Corsair VS 650 W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply $42.98 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor Acer G277HL bid 27.0" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $129.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $917.90
Mail-in rebates -$45.00
Total $872.90
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-25 12:11 EDT-0400

Same price (for DRAM, something else must have updated its price), better DRAM.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "6TB HDD Choice? WD Black 6TB vs Barracuda Pro 6TB"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

HDDs are simply going to be slow. About the only other thing you can be certain of is that you don't want a Seagate SMR drive (for your application. They are often fine for backup).

There are a few things I'd look into when dealing with large drives:

First, find some sort of caching or tiering system that helps fix your problems for you. Primocache seems to be the obvious choice (you might want to set it to "write through" for even more safety), with windows internal tiering another option (AMD tiering leads to disk corruption and plenty of grief, but Windows tiering seems to be a big thing for windows server. I don't think they can afford to go around corrupting those filesystems).

Secondly, I'd look into "shucking" large drives for the hard drive inside. Occasionally you might have to tape off a pin on WD elements enclosures, but even there the drives are such a good deal that this really isn't a problem. Just unscrew/pry open the enclosure and install the standard hard drive inside (this voids your warranty, but since the warranty is only for the drive and not the data, I've never really cared about HDD warranties anyway).

  • more notes on windows (and AMD) tiering. These work entirely on drives and not partitions (although theoretically you can use the "leftover" SSD area on AMD tiering, I just don't trust it), so don't expect to partition off some of your boot SSD/NVMe drive for tiering: it's all or nothing. But it looks like you case (dealing with huge files) would be a win for such a choice (although I think primocache would make more sense).

PS. The filesystem itself can easily slow down for drives >90% full, not to mention that SSD/NVMe drives tend to really get clobbered in such states (that psuedo-SLC caching can use less and less "free space"). But it looks like you need a new drive anyway.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "which external hard drive 8TB to buy??"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

[EDIT: Sorry, the prices below are pretty specific to the US. The WD Elements is likely still a good drive/shucking source, but it is typically not the clear winner like it is in the US.]

Should be a great buy. I'd also look at the WD Elements 10TB drive. That goes on sale at Best Buy during all the major holidays, and possibly slightly more often to ~$160. I'm less sure about the price of the 8TB, but I've seen it at $120 often enough.

This is about as good a price/TB as you are going to get, and you don't have to worry about the SMR (slow writes/fast reads) that plague large Seagate drives.

If these don't fit your needs, you either have a serious data hording problem (or don't need it and don't have one at all).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "which external hard drive 8TB to buy??"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Either to backup data or to shuck for an inexpensive internal HDD. Either way they are about the cheapest way to store terrabytes of data. Just don't expect to access them as fast as a NVMe drive, but you shouldn't drop frames when streaming a movie.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Under $800 US: Strictly coding and streaming"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

The Microcenter SSD "good stuff" is the "premium" line. Basically an E12 NVMe similar to a Sabrant Rocket.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Check over my list?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

A bulldozer build for a "friend"? Some friend you are... Try this. PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $119.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450M BAZOOKA V2 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $82.89 @ OutletPC
Memory Patriot Viper Steel 16 GB (1 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $64.99 @ Amazon
Storage Sabrent Rocket 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $109.98 @ Amazon
Video Card Sapphire Radeon RX 580 8 GB PULSE Video Card $169.99 @ Newegg
Case Cooler Master MasterBox Q300L MicroATX Mini Tower Case $42.99 @ Best Buy
Power Supply Corsair VS 650 W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply $42.98 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $99.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor Acer G277HL bid 27.0" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $129.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $908.69
Mail-in rebates -$45.00
Total $863.69
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-09-25 10:59 EDT-0400

Note that the price is ~$600 without windows or monitor, but it's just a pile of parts unless you have them.

The Intel i5 9400F is a real possibility. The 2600 is typically preferred, and I'm not at all familiar with Intel motherboards so I listed the 2600. I'm equally unsure about the RX580 video card, but am a big fan of its power/price (I don't think nvidia was willing to price the 1660 low enough to compete). It should at least outperform your listed 1050 card (if get a bit noisy). Also I left out any CPU cooler: keeping the price low meant not throwing away a perfectly good included CPU fan.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc part build - very new to the pc scene"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Blow by blow: [TL;DR By all means change the storage and video parts. The others are less important but still are significant improvements.]

8700k i7 vs. 3700X: Intel may have a slight [measurable but probably unnoticeable] lead in some low-thread areas, but can't make it up when more threads are active. Go with AMD (you'd be hard pressed to find the difference between the ~$350 8700k i7 and the ~$200 3600 Ryzen and the 3700x is at least a step up).

NVMe vs. HDD: No comparison. The NVMe will instantly respond while the HDD s l o w l y loads your data. If there is a Microcenter nearby, you might consider the Inland Premium (not Pro) 1TB NVMe (it uses the same controller), and there are other NVMe options, but this is a great place to start looking. If you only change one thing - this is what has to change.

You might want a large HDD (4TB, probably closer to 8TB) if you want to store a lot of data, but for normal usage stick to solid state (and NVMe if the premium isn't too high, such as the Sabrent Rocket).

1070 vs 2080 Super: No comparison. The 1070 might be an excellent value on the used market, but it has been discontinued and new old stock prices aren't acceptable. The 2080 Super is roughly 3 cards ahead (one generation plus the additional 70 vs. 80, and possibly a bit more thanks to the "super" designation) and shows it. A $200 1070 (used) might make sense. A $400 (new) 1070 does not. This is the second most important change (although the others should save you quite a bit of money, this will add the performance).

Corsair liquid cooler: Note that this might be overkill on the AMD. You might want to look at the performance/noise of air coolers for the 3700X, but I can't list that off the top of my head and it is largely a personal option. You'll note that eesti didn't change it because it might be best for you.

Memory: higher bandwidth and lower latency (yes, the CAS is one higher in clock cycles but in actual nanoseconds it is lower) this is clearly a win. Note that it is nothing like the other improvements, but still a win.

Case: your call. I have to side with eesti as I put a case together, put it under my desk and forget it. Spending an extra $100 doesn't make much sense, and they look pretty similar to me (then again I didn't add ~$100 worth of 3 RGB fans...).

Power Supply: considering the estimated wattage is ~400W (for both lists), going over 800W is simply paying money to kill your efficiency. Go with a smaller name brand power supply such as what eesti suggests (but I'd still keep it over 600W). If you go with the AMD you also don't have to worry about extra Watts for overclocking: AMD pretty much gives you all the power without having to jump through overclocking hoops to wring all you paid for out of the chip: the power listed on the chip is the power it consumes (Intel is a bit different).

Optical drive: your call. If you have a ton of CDs/DVDs lying around, you probably want an optical drive of some sort (I was a bit irritated when I noticed I couldn't plug an ancient IDE dvd drive into a modern computer). But don't assume that it makes any sense to back up data onto blu-ray (or DVD): the cost is higher just for media than external hard drives (and probably USB flash drives) and limited to 25GB a disc. If you aren't going to be using this for movies, but still need your old CD/DVDs, I'd look for a simple ~$20 DVD writer (Amazon at least has them).

Windows OEM vs. Home full USB. Googling isn't helping, but if you have a working (windows) computer you should be able to download windows and stick it on a USB stick (pretty sure I did that). You'll have to ask eesti about other issues (is it tied to the motherboard or not - the one I put on a USB wasn't, but I don't think it could tell until I typed in the product key). USB Full might still be best for a "first build": unlike Linux, windows is a real pain to install...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Question about gtx 1660 ti"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Kerbal Space Program, Cities: Skylines, and anything else that is typically limited by CPU and not GPU (assuming the monitor isn't the limit). Sometimes you just can't hit 60fps with a 2080ti.

And even then you will only have difficulties with huge spacecraft/huge cities.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Allrounder Build Editing/Gaming/Engineering simulations"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Depends on the "sim". Electrical simulations are notoriously single threaded. Not sure about mechanical engineering work, but I'd assume that FEA is if not embarrassingly parallel will at least hit 32 threads with no problem. If you care about thread-happy loads, I'd look at a 2700X or similar (probably winding up with something from AMD, although I suspect the discounted threadrippers aren't good "all rounders" while the 2700X should qualify). Otherwise the i5 is a great chip (with a better cooler).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Compatibility Question"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

On the other hand, if it doesn't show up in pcpartpicker I'd assume it is some flybynight vendor and wouldn't want anything to do with it.

Rotating media is pretty safe (two [?] manufacturers, so they don't want to make anything that will make them look bad. Actual NAND flash chip manufacturers aren't all that common (I think there are less than 10 companies with competitive fabs). There aren't that many controller manufacturers (but some controllers are real duds).

But putting the controller and flash together? Pretty much anybody can do that and leave off something critical (typically DRAM, but there are some good DRAMless controllers out there. I'd worry more about things that are impossible to check, like insufficient overprovision of flash). I'd like to stick to companies I'd at least heard of, with some type of benchmarks available on that product.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Used Mobos?"

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Mostly it depends on the CPU you want and the price of the motherboard. It's probably a better idea than "new old stock" for older CPUs. Then there's the "bathtub curve" - a working motherboard will probably stay working, and won't have to be returned under warranty (not sure of the expected life of a motherboard, but add how long you plan on keeping it).

On a nearly unrelated note - I'd recommend forgetting about buying used X570 motherboards in the future: that fan is an obvious single point of failure that can doom the board.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "27 inch 1080p vs 1440p - For general use (not gaming)"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

One option is to go completely over the top and buy a 43 4k TV. Here's a thread on my experiences buying one: https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/326815-using-a-tv-as-a-monitor-43-4k-60hz-200

The price seems a bit inline with 27" and 32" 1440p monitors, although I did check slickdeals often to try to get the price down to ~$200. The dot pitch is comparable to the 32" 1440p monitor, but with another 40% more screen available.

Note that you need a remotely modern GPU to drive (not remotely top of the line, just newish) the thing with HDMI2.x whether you plan to game with it or not, my trusty 560ti (which was fine doing 1080@60Hz) just couldn't display 4k at all.

In practice, the screen is so big it is more like using multiple monitors only better: don't expect to focus on more than a small part of the screen at once. But if you want more deskspace, it can't be beat.

Examples of dot pitch (since I'm using diagonals it isn't real "dot pitch", but the true dot pitch will scale evenly): 23.5/1080=.0217

27.0/1080=.0250

27.0/1440=.0188

32.0/1440=.0222

43.0/2080=.0207

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Triple monitor Racing build"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Assuming you can buy from Amazon.fr, they have a Sabrant Rocket 1TB @120euros. If that is indeed a Phison E12 drive (Amazon isn't a great source for technical information, and I can't read French) it is probably a decent upgrade over an MX500 (although how often you will notice it in a simrig may be a moot point). https://fr.pcpartpicker.com/product/N7zkcf/sabrent-1-tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-sb-rocket-1tb

The rest of Test19's list is hard to beat, although you need to specify what resolution those monitors have to run at 60Hz: you may want to scrimp on everything else for the most powerful GPU you can afford in the EU)... So mostly this will be about things you didn't ask about...

I'd strongly suggest looking into a VR headset over 3 monitors. It might require >60Hz performance (although mine is stuck with 60Hz), but the difference is amazing.

For only sim-racing, the CPU should be mostly a moot point. I'd still expect a Ryzen 3000 to have superior floating point over the Intel choice, so AMD might have advantages in the future. But I don't think you can go wrong with nvidia over AMD (chance of missing a tiny bit of performance vs. lots of things that can go wrong with AMD [and I just switched to AMD myself]).

A thread I made on a possible choice for 60Hz monitor[s] (although it probably will have issues with a 2060 driving 3 such monitors): https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/326815-using-a-tv-as-a-monitor-43-4k-60hz-200

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is this wiki page correct about FLOPS?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

The GPU numbers are "per core" for the most optimistic number of "cores". By these numbers an AMD5700 has "2304 cores" and a GTX2080 Super has "3072 cores". Even for wiki, this is technically accurate but completely missing the point.

Back in the supercomputer era these were derisively called "Macho Flops". Unless your compiler can keep all the vectors full and you have enough bandwidth to keep swapping out registers as needed, you aren't going to get all the flops (otherwise supercomputing would be about setting up a network full of computers stuffed with GPUs).

Another thing not mentioned in the wiki is that Intel CPUs using AVX-512 tend to severely drop the clockspeed the moment an AVX-512 instruction is touched. There will still be an increase in overall FLOPS (assuming you can fill the vector and have a long enough routine), but programmers quickly learned not to use them unless they had a lot of floating point that needed to be done (this wasn't an issue with the Xeon Phi as it didn't do anything but AVX-512 anyway).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "DO YOU KNOW IF INTELL AND AMD WILL RELEASE NEW CPUS THE NEXT YEAR?/2020?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

A definite maybe.

AMD has shipped three CPUs at ~14-16 month intervals.

Intel has shipped a CPU a year with yet another "plus" added to the 14nm process. This year they should ship a 10nm notebook CPU (should be available for Christmas), followed by a desktop 10nm next year. Check the success of the notebook chip before making plans for next year's desktop.

Intel's 10nm chip should use the "Sunny Cove" architecture, something that finally has some sort of difference in the integer core in the last 10 years (why break a great design before Zen started breathing down its neck?). It should have slightly higher IPC but don't count on a clock higher than Coffee Lake (possibly lower than Ryzen).

With Zen2, AMD pretty much hit all the notes we could expect them to hit with Zen. Built on a state of the art process (expect it to take several years before TSMC 7nm is truly leapfrogged). Microcode cache finally works. AVX256 is available (well, functioning as AVX256, you can execute the instructions on zen/zen+). There really isn't all that much room for improvement on the CPU until TSMC gets something different to build on (perhaps Navi will get more love).

Perhaps they will give up on chiplets if TSMC's 7+nm can provide cheaper transistors than GloFo. Rumors speak of 4 threads (which might barely improve some server code, it would be disabled on Ryzen), but I can't see that happening without Bulldozer-style weirdness. What I want to see is something like a HBM "dram cache" with 3dXP main memory (presumably next year Micron will be able to sell it however they want), but that is a pretty unlikely idea.

AMD has claimed that "zen3 is done" (for whatever values equal "done": I'm pretty sure it doesn't mean tape-out). I'd expect anything available next year to be more like zen2+, regardless of what AMD calls it. Also something like a September release would make a lot of sense as they have been releasing a bit later each year.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Using Old Hard Drive ???"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

You can keep as much software as you like on the machine. Any applications will likely require reinstalling, but the data can typically be copied after that's done. Any Steam games (or the odd other software) typically don't require that, just tell it to download over the old steam library and it won't download anything it already has and set things up to run on the new system.

An 256G Inland Premium NVMe runs $37 at my local Microcenter ($60 for 512G). Not all NVMe drives charge a significant premium over SATA (and Crucial BX is a pretty good buy for SATA already).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "How good are black friday deals"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

No idea. The last few years seem to have been meh, but I was surprised at the deals I got over "Prime day competition": even if the Prime day deals were meh, Newegg certainly had some amazing deals.

I doubt the retailers have any specifics they plan on dealing yet, and probably worrying more about politics than Black Friday. On the other hand, any container ship leaving after Halloween (and possibly a week earlier) won't make it to Black Friday/Cyber Monday so they have to put their orders in before then. Check back late October or so for better rumors.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thoughts on Fry's Closing?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Ouch. I only remember Frys from reports from usenet (90-95) where it seemed the greatest computer store outside of Akihabara. In 1995 I was on the West coast and discovered that it more or less lived up to the hype (roughly a Best Buy four times the size, and selling everything up to and including oscilloscopes). Even by 2000 it seemed to be going strong, but that was while Amazon was still mainly selling books. I haven't been back (and Best Buy nearly died, so "four times as big" doesn't sound like a good idea).

Microcenter certainly looks healthy enough, although I suspect that the "sale board" in the CPU section still compares their prices to Newegg's and not Amazon (Rockville, MD does this. The other two local-ish stores don't, so I don't know if this is common in other Microcenters or not).

I'll be somewhat sad to see it go, but it hasn't been part of my life since 2010ish or whenever they stopped selling CPU+motherboard bundles via internet. Those were some good deals, but for years afterwards they were in person only. It sounds like they haven't been a thing in years.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Value 1tb hdd?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

I'd be careful of buying a Hitachi drive from Amazon now. Nothing wrong with Hitachi, but there seem to be used drives being sold as new on Amazon. https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/327924-used-drives-poping-up-from-amazon (especially Vagabond's comment).

The Baracudas are probably your best bet, and if at all possible I'd go for the 2TB.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Raid 0?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Agreed. Don't RAID the SATA with the M.2 and don't use RAID 0 at all (unless you absolutely don't care about losing that data. And don't be suprised when you realize you had data you want back when the drive gets corrupted).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Using Old Hard Drive ???"

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

Checking on the newegg specs (I'd go straight to Asrock for the real data if I was buying), you can add either up to 2 NVMe drives (PCIe based) and 3 SATA drives or 1 NVMe drive and 4 SATA drives.

The case lists (from pcpartpicker) 2 3.5" drive bays and 1 2.5" drive bay, so I'm guessing it will be full, but everything should fit.

So 3 SATA drives shouldn't be a problem. Just expect things to be much slower (similar to your old computer) when accessing the old hard drives. I'd want them in the computer myself, as what is on the hard drives seems most of why I have the computer in the first place.

  • PS I'm likely going down to Microcenter to pick up a NVMe card today: using the NVMe connector on my motherboard disables two SATA interfaces and NVMe cards seem the cheapest way to fix this (I knew this when I bought the motherboard, it still made the most sense to buy).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Used drives poping up from Amazon"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/kxndnQ/hitachi-ultrastar-2-tb-35-7200rpm-internal-hard-drive-hua722020ala330 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01K8Z4908/?tag=pcpapi-20

I suspect the "renewed" bit is meant to be in the fine print and get past as many filters as possible. This is the very first hit (as of 9:41pm EDT 9/5/2019, but also when I posted) when sorting by Price/GB.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My CPU is overheating like mad! (AMD Athlon x4 860k)"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm guessing that's what the results that you get after measuring the diode are and everybody at AMD thought it was someone else's job to fix it to 0C-70C (or perhaps Fahrenheit). Considering that they link the "BIOS and Kernal developers guide", this was probably made by engineers for engineers as opposed to consumers.

Not realizing that "AMD Overdrive" would be used by consumers and that would have to be fixed may be one of the reasons that Intel has twenty times the market share of AMD (now that AMD has clawed some back).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Intel or Ryzen for trading?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

The point is that until I found that out I was convinced that "anything can do 2d, you only have to worry about 3d". This had been largely true since graphics cards shipped with at least 8MB (yes, megabytes) of RAM to hold the entire framebuffer.

But it turns out that early HDMI (and to a lesser extent displayport) really wheren't up to the bandwidth needed for some of these resolutions (and refreshes), so simply grabbing any cheap card as long as it has three working outputs on the back won't quite work, at least for the most demanding monitors.

I recently upgraded virtually my entire system and considered delaying upgrading the GPU for a generation (I'd expect more "4k friendly" GPUs to be cheaper) but discovered that mating my trusty GTX560ti (a fine 1080 GPU, especially if your tastes run to old games) to a 4k monitor just wasn't going to happen. So when I saw "570" pop up, I figured I had to speak up (I thought I knew GPUs pretty well but that was a surprise).

All this fuss and he goes with a [single?] 1080 monitor and RX5700 GPU? At least attach a few more monitors to it if you are going to look like a trader...

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need the cheapest build for WOW classic"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Seeing that it is basically a 2004 game, I'd assume the cheapest/oldest existing PC you can find on craigslist.

You might want [barely] upgrade such a thing, so look for computers with DDR3 and SATA ports (I wouldn't trust a real 2004 machine to have them). Going the used route should do wonders for things like your Windows license, monitor, case, power supply, mouse, and keyboard. If you slip a bit more RAM or SSD into the thing, so much the better.

A quick check of my local craigslist had an old phenonII [don't ask] based system with monitor for $120, and a vastly more powerful intel i5 system for a bit more (but no monitor).

I also found this https://www.newegg.com/p/2NR-000A-00CT3?Item=9SIA9AX9MD6728 There are cheaper Dells on the list, but they have Pentium 4s which tend to run hot and I'd avoid (although I'd prefer core and later to any pre-Ryzen AMD chip). Also Microcenter has some good deals in refurbished PCs, although expect to buy the monitor seperately (which could easily double the price over the linked AIO).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I use Ubuntu or other linux os's to run games?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Minecraft works on Java, so it is a no-brainer to install (the original, getting the next one that is designed for windows might be an issue).

Steam works directly with Ubuntu, so that is a good place to start. Just don't expect an extensive Steam library to all be there (but you might see more than you expect).

There are claims that fps is as good as windows (presumably things with a full Linux port), but that hasn't been my experience (even with Kerbal Space Program which comes with the official Linux port). Depending on your hardware (especially the GPU), you might get more "bang for your buck" with that $100 MS price than paying a similar amount to Nvidia. One great thing about Linux is that you can try your entire build with it before having to cough up for Windows, so I'd certainly recommend trying it first and seeing if you still feel that the ~$100 is warranted.

  • Just a long term Linux user who coughed up for Window 8 (a great deal that was the "non-OEM" edition that allowed me to copy it on to followup builds). So I really haven't bothered trying to force Linux to game (for some reason my copy of Steam [in Mint] isn't accepting m password. Previous [ubuntu and LMDE] copies of Steam worked, so it might be some sort of ASCII-unicode switch when I cut and paste my password).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Beginner Advice on Gaming PCs!!"

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

As you might guess "custom gaming PCs" are pretty expensive for what you get. I'd be curious if the "water cooling" includes the GPU as well (my guess is no, that wouldn't work with their "easy to upgrade" claim).

I'd expect it to work fine at 4k on older games like Skyrim (even SE), Witcher, [not sure about the latest Tomb Raider]: I've been doing fine on Skyrim at 4k on a Vega56 (certainly less powerful than a 2070).

I'd also recommend looking at UK build guides here : https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/guide/

Don't forget to add ~85 quid for Windows (185 if you want Pro). This does include AIO watercooling (which might just add extra noise on the AMD side), so that evens things out a bit. I don't think either novatech nor the build guides include a monitor at those prices.

Basically PCs have been plug and play for decades, and this entire site is dedicated to custom builds. The lack of information of putting the thing all together is largely due to the shear simplicity of things: if the parts fit together: that's where they are supposed to go.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Why is this SSD hella expensive?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 2 points

Probably the last existing [new old stock] part of that model. They are hoping that somebody will need exactly that part. If a contract calls for that SSD, getting it changed can easily cost >$17k (currency of your choice).

Or it is a mis-price, that's my real guess. Either way, nobody really cares about 280G SSDs anymore (unless something is very specific to a contract).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Thermal Paste in Motherboard AMD4 Socket"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

Shouldn't be an issue, the only two possibilities are:

Does it short two pins (can't see it squishing out enough and linking the next door pin)?

Can it physically block the pin? No, not going to happen here (and typically I'd fear a short first).

I guess it might be possible to spread out and insulate the chip from the socket on that pin, but generally speaking anything that conducts heat conducts electricity (diamond is probably the least exotic material that only conducts heat). I know I have a larger bit of thermal paste in my socket (I bought the motherboard open box), and really didn't worry about it as it won't short two pins. How in the world did you (and the guy who had mine earlier) manage this?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is readon vii worth getting still?"

  • 4 months ago
  • 1 point

If you really mean "workstation" it might be for you. If you want a gaming GPU forget it. The biggest obvious advantage is 16GB of extremely fast RAM. I'd also be nervous about AMD's OpenGL software, and check it against whatever software you are using before buying this.

Finding a new one might be difficult, I doubt they made any more than the original bunch.

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