add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

Comments

Comments

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Evo 970 vs Evo 860"

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

There's a pretty big difference between them. If you aren't transferring HUGE files, there really isn't a need to spend the extra money for the NVME drive. The 860 Evo is fast for a SATA SSD and will be just fine for transferring regular sized files or gaming or whatever the case may be. The convenience of M.2 is quite nice though considering it's very easy to install and remove if nothing is blocking the M.2 section of the motherboard. My GPU and AIO block mine so it's not exactly easy for me to remove mine.

970 is an M.2 form factor NVME SSD which will have up to 3,500MB/s of sequential read performance and up to 2,700MB/s of sequential write performance.

860 Evo is a 2.5" SATA SSD that will have up to 550 MB/s sequential read performance and 520 MB/s sequential write performance.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Which setup is better"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Given the single-core performance of the i7, I would personally go that route if this build is mostly or purely for gaming. The Intel CPU will definitely help out and get you closer to achieving higher FPS.

If you'll also be editing photo/video, streaming or doing more multi-core workloads, I would suggest the Ryzen for the higher core count, much higher thread count and better multi-core performance. Don't get me wrong though, the i7 is still more than capable of streaming/editing. I just prefer the R7 for such tasks.

And just so you know, I use an EVGA RTX 2070 XC Ultra with a 2700X and I typically average about 90-110FPS in 1440p pretty much maxed out with most titles so you should have no trouble with 1080p high refresh rate.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Raid 10 options"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

I second the SATA SSD for a scratch drive.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC build, part suggestions/problems?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

In the past, I've had some good deals on eBay as well as locally with Craigslist or even Facebook Marketplace. There typically isn't very much on Amazon in terms of used equipment on Amazon in my experience. eBay will back you if something bad happens, just buy from a reputable seller.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First PC build, part suggestions/problems?"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Um.. You're considering an Intel Xeon E3 for a gaming build?

This is basically you're cheapest option if you want newer titles to run fairly smoothly in 1080p using new components. You may consider looking at these components pre-owned in order to get within budget or close-to.

I would personally suggest that you save up about $100-150 more in order to get a good, well-rounded entry level gaming PC that will last for a few years and play most games in 1080p60.

  • Yes, the PSU is WAYYYY overkill but B&H has a smoking deal on it right now.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 3 2200G 3.5 GHz Quad-Core Processor $99.47 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B450M PRO4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $82.68 @ OutletPC
Memory Patriot - Viper 4 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $44.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA - GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4 GB SC GAMING ACX 2.0 Video Card $169.90 @ OutletPC
Case Thermaltake - Versa H15 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $33.00 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $39.99 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $619.92
Mail-in rebates -$90.00
Total $529.92
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-01-03 18:35 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building my first PC ($1500 budget) Need help"

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

So, I left some budget for you to play with in case you wanted to change anything or add anything.

  • R5 2600. Great CPU for the cost. 6 cores and 12 threads so it's perfect for gaming, light editing and even streaming. Very capable for the cost. I did not include a CPU cooler because it does come with a good one.

  • Matched the R5 with a good B450 motherboard. If you don't need WIFI, you can definitely get a B450 for about $20 cheaper. If you're wanting to overclock, you may consider an X470 instead, however, B450 is able to push a light overclock if you wanted to.

  • 16GB of RAM should be perfect.

  • 500GB SSD + 2TB HDD should also be perfect.

  • RTX 2070 is a good choice for the price point. May as well get this over a 1070ti/1080. 2070 sits almost between a 1080 and 1080ti in terms of performance plus you can jump on the DLSS/DXR train.

  • I decided to include a more premium case that way you have something that is not only durable but also very compatible with current/future components. It's also very pretty IMO and it has an open front panel which is great for airflow.

  • 650W fully modular and very popular PSU. Should have enough wattage for overclocking/future upgrades.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $164.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS PRO WIFI (rev. 1.0) ATX AM4 Motherboard $123.98 @ Newegg
Memory GeIL - SUPER LUCE RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $82.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Black Video Card $499.99 @ B&H
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C Dark TG ATX Mid Tower Case $98.34 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.89 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1239.96
Mail-in rebates -$20.00
Total $1219.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-31 16:00 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Build opinions and question about cooling."

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

You may consider an Intel build. Ryzen is great and there's no doubt the R7 would offer more value as well as longevity from the system but as mentioned, AutoCad does run better on Intel based systems. I don't believe you would have any issues if you go Ryzen and hell, I don't even know how much of a difference it would make so that is purely up to you. I have a 2700X and love it.

  • Swapped for an 8700K.

  • 240mm AIO. The Deepcool Captain is a pretty awesome bang-for-the-buck AIO. It's also white to match the case. The X62 is very pretty but it's quite expensive for what you get.

  • Obviously swapped the motherboard. Tried to go with something as comparable to that Aorus Ultra you had picked out.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $369.89 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Deepcool - CAPTAIN 240EX WHITE 153.04 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $88.89 @ B&H
Motherboard Gigabyte - Z370 AORUS Ultra Gaming (rev. 1.0) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $134.67 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $139.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $127.99 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB Black Video Card $499.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT - H700i ATX Mid Tower Case $169.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ B&H
Monitor Acer - G257HU smidpx 25.0" 2560x1440 60 Hz Monitor $199.99 @ Newegg
Monitor Acer - G257HU smidpx 25.0" 2560x1440 60 Hz Monitor $199.99 @ Newegg
Other Asiahorse Customization Mod Sleeve Extension Power Supply Cable Kit 18AWG ATX/EPS/8-pin PCI-E/6-pin PCI-E (white) $32.99
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $2104.26
Mail-in rebates -$20.00
Total $2084.26
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-31 15:20 EST-0500

Comment reply on ProbablyProdigy's Completed Build: Third Time's a Charm!

  • 13 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! No. To this day, they haven't responded to any of the three emails and support tickets I created. Not sure what's going on but in the end, I'm not too upset about the GPU. I ended up removing the bracket from the GPU and taking a dremel to it in order to widen the mounting holes. Now it fits okay.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Son's first gaming PC"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks like a good build. My only suggestion would be to do your best to try and squeeze in a small ~256GB SSD in there. That will make a HUGE difference with boot time, transfer speeds and just general use.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Needed: Ryzen 3 build for Old Guy Gaming & Voice Over Recording"

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

I know, it's a minimal difference which is way I didn't suggest that, I just wanted to provide all the options.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions Needed: Ryzen 3 build for Old Guy Gaming & Voice Over Recording"

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Build looks great.

  • The R3 2200G has integrated Vega 8 graphics which will be about on par with a 1030/1050. So, I would either just stick with the integrated graphics or upgrade the GPU to something like a 1050ti/1060, however, that isn't needed for your uses. You can also consider the R5 2400G with Vega 11 graphics but for the price, you wouldn't see much difference.

  • You could get also get away with 8GB of RAM probably but I noticed the dual monitors so unless you need 16GB for multitasking.

  • I personally wouldn't go with a 5400RPM HDD or the WD AV-GP. You may consider a WD Blue or Seagate Barracuda 7200RPM.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build. Looking for suggestions or criticism"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

So, I use a 2700X and that exact GPU in my build. I also have a Dell 1440p144 monitor and it's a fantastic combination. It's not quite capable of pushing a true 144hz but I typically end up in the 90-120FPS range depending on the game with mostly high settings. It's a great combination and I would highly suggest the 2070 for 1080p high refresh gaming but personally, if I were to do it again, I probably would have saved up some more money to get a 2080.

For the rest of your build, the CPU is a bit overkill as I would generally suggest a R5 for a mostly gaming build. I can understand wanting to go overkill considering you mentioned that you wouldn't upgrade for a while but the R7 is a lot of CPU for normal use. If you wanted to save some money, you'd probably be just fine with a R5 2600/2600X.

The PSU and motherboard are also a bit overkill.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $159.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $82.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard Gigabyte - X470 AORUS ULTRA GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard $128.89 @ OutletPC
Memory Corsair - Vengeance RGB Pro 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $149.99 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung - 970 Evo 500 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $132.38 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $549.99 @ B&H
Case NZXT - H700i ATX Mid Tower Case $169.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.89 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1494.11
Mail-in rebates -$40.00
Total $1454.11
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-18 17:36 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building a new Mini ITX build."

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

No worries, if you want SFF, the H200 would be a better choice than the Manta. I would also try and go for the H200i since that will give you a tempered glass side panel versus an acrylic side panel which will scratch very easily and is pretty much inevitable.

This would be a very nice build!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $369.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Deepcool - CAPTAIN 240EX WHITE 153.04 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $88.89 @ B&H
Motherboard Asus - ROG STRIX B360-I GAMING Mini ITX LGA1151 Motherboard $122.97 @ Amazon
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.00 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $39.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Asus - GeForce GTX 1070 8 GB Dual Series Video Card $334.89 @ OutletPC
Case NZXT - H200i (White/Black) Mini ITX Tower Case $109.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.89 @ OutletPC
Case Fan Corsair - HD120 RGB 3-Pack w/Controller 54.4 CFM 120mm Fans $73.57 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1482.17
Mail-in rebates -$80.00
Total $1402.17
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-17 12:28 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building a new Mini ITX build."

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks good.

  • 120mm AIOs tend to have pretty bad value to performance. If you want an AIO, it's best to spend just a few more bucks on a 240mm which should offer far better value. For under ~80ish, I would ultimately suggest an air cooler.

  • The Manta is a cool case but very dated. I would highly suggest going with something newer like the white Meshify C. Excellent build quality, open front panel for airflow and it looks great IMO.

  • Considering the case, I also swapped out the motherboard. The Aorus Ultra is great. While it will have a couple small orange accents, the majority is RGB. Plus, with all the hardware, you probably wouldn't see the orange accents.

  • I would also highly suggest that you spend a few more bucks on a 1070ti, even if you may not find a white one.

  • Newer version of that PSU.

  • White RGB RAM?

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-8700K 3.7 GHz 6-Core Processor $369.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Deepcool - CAPTAIN 240EX WHITE 153.04 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $88.89 @ B&H
Motherboard Gigabyte - Z370 AORUS Ultra Gaming (rev. 1.0) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $139.99 @ Newegg
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.00 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - BarraCuda 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $43.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card Asus - GeForce GTX 1070 8 GB Dual Series Video Card $334.89 @ OutletPC
Case Fractal Design - Meshify C White TG ATX Mid Tower Case $77.11 @ Amazon
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.89 @ OutletPC
Case Fan Corsair - HD120 RGB 3-Pack w/Controller 54.4 CFM 120mm Fans $73.57 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1470.21
Mail-in rebates -$80.00
Total $1390.21
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-16 17:57 EST-0500

Comment reply on Showgenz's Completed Build: My first build ryzen 7 2700x.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

2070 is an excellent choice. Now that i've had it for awhile, it doesn't quite perform to the standards that I was expecting but it's a beast of a card for me.

If you get can get a 1070ti for a lot less money, that would be the way to go.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking for help on this Ryzen 7 2700x build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

That's a fair point. The R7 is an 8 core / 16 thread CPU so I mean, there will be plenty of power for many years considering your uses. An R5 2600 would definitely last you a few years for gaming, general use and even some editing if you ever needed to. Just something to keep in mind. That's extra money for the GPU upgrade!

So here are some revisions.

  • R7 1700X. Only 5 more bucks over the regular 1700. This won't include a cooler at all but I did include the Noctua NH-D15S which is among the best. I included an extra Noctua fan that's black/gray since it'll come with a fan that has Noctua's notorious brown and beige color scheme. Up to you.

  • Since we may go to 1st gen Ryzen, we can use a B350 motherboard.

  • 16GB of 3000mhz RAM. This was actually one of the cheapest and it's RGB. I changed this because I noticed the kit that you picked out originally was not showing a price.

  • Cases are purely subjective. The P400S is GREAT for the price but it will lack in airflow compared to something like the Fractal Design Meshify C with an open front panel. Shouldn't really affect you too much but again, something to keep in mind.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 1700X 3.4 GHz 8-Core Processor $200.88 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-D15S 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler $79.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - B350 PC MATE ATX AM4 Motherboard $75.89 @ B&H
Memory GeIL - SUPER LUCE RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.00 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive Purchased For $0.00
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 960 4 GB Video Card Purchased For $0.00
Case Phanteks - ECLIPSE P400S TEMPERED GLASS ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ B&H
Case Fan Noctua - NF-P14s redux-1500 PWM 78.69 CFM 140mm Fan $14.95 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $733.59
Mail-in rebates -$40.00
Total $693.59
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-13 22:19 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

If you're wanting to stream, then I would probably say to try and get a bit more CPU. The R3 probably wouldn't handle streaming very well. If you're able to stretch the budget, try and go for the Ryzen 5 1600 since that is a 6 core / 12 thread CPU.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Looking for help on this Ryzen 7 2700x build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Everything looks pretty good. If you don't mind my asking, why are you wanting the Ryzen 7 2700X to begin with? In your description, you only mentioned gaming and if that's all you'll be doing, the R7 is quite overkill. Typically, the R5 is perfect for gaming and even streaming.

  • Just so you know, the 1st generation Ryzen 7 1700/1700X offers WAY more value than the 2700X. You'll only lose a couple of smaller things like the XFR capability and the fancy RGB cooler but the 1700X is $90 cheaper than the 2700X. $90 can get you a 240mm AIO or one of the best air coolers on the market.

  • I put a B450 motherboard into the build. You can get an X470 if you want better overclocking performance, better VRM cooling, etc.

  • As of now, a 550W PSU will do but this will kinda depend on the GPU that you upgrade to. Don't get a 550W if you'll upgrade to a 2080ti but don't get a 1000W if you only plan to upgrade to a 1060/1070. I included a 750W only because it is the same price as the 650W. A 750W is more than enough for future upgrades and a major GPU upgrade.

  • Do you need a case or OS or anything else?

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $289.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS ELITE ATX AM4 Motherboard $94.99 @ Amazon
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory -
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.00 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive Purchased For $0.00
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 960 4 GB Video Card Purchased For $0.00
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $546.97
Mail-in rebates -$20.00
Total $526.97
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-13 18:15 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

As Crofter mentioned, those would be things to upgrade if you increase your initial budget. Depending on your uses, I would personally try and upgrade the GPU a bit as I believe the R3 2200G is a great starter CPU and you shouldn't really require more than that if this is a first time build for 1080p gaming.

I would personally try and find a good used RX 580 and then spend the extra budget for 16GB of RAM.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "GTX 1060 6GB Mini & i5-5250u over Thunderbolt 2"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

As esotken mentioned, you will of course lose some performance with an EGPU solution, however, I don't believe it's quite to that extent but maybe it is with thunderbolt 2 rather than thunderbolt 3.

A desktop 1060 6GB would very easily handle 1080p60 on high settings with an average desktop so I'd imagine you should be able to achieve 1080p60 around low or medium settings using the MacBook. It's hard to say on the bottleneck. It's an i5 but it's also just a 15 watt dual core CPU so it will probably affect performance - I just don't know how much.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Pc build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah, this would be about as good as it can get unless OP can score some things that are open-box or pre-owned. Which might be worth looking into. Also just consider that the RAM and SSD are using the Newegg Business pricing so those items will be a bit more expensive unless OP has a business account.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Desk PC questions"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I second this.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions?"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

this CPU that won't need to be changed that soon

Why would it need to be changed soon? It's an 8th gen 6 core 6 thread CPU? It's literally perfect for gaming and general use. There's no sense in paying far more for the i7 if the OP isn't going to be streaming or editing. And it certainly wouldn't bottleneck the system at all. A 1070ti + i5-8600k is literally the perfect match for someone who just wants to game, overclock and achieve 1080p60 maxed out.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions?"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks great!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "The Perfect Computer Desk"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Check these out. You don't have to go with the lift desk but they all allow you to design your perfect desk. Maybe one of them will work for you.

https://www.upliftdesk.com/

https://www.evodesk.com/

https://www.xdesk.com/custom

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC Being bought"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

That's correct. It'll support up to a 360mm rad in either the front or top. Do your research though because my Meshify C requires the HDD brackets to be removed in order to fit a 360mm. I need my a HDDs so unfortunately that won't work for me.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinions?"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks good!

  • Swapped out the RAM for something a bit faster. Same price and 3000mhz. There is also a black/red variation for the same price if you'd prefer that.

  • Unless you need the 1TB of SSD storage, I swapped it out for a 500GB SATA SSD (way cheaper) and a 2TB HDD. If this will be for mostly gaming, you'll appreciate the larger HDD size.

  • Replaced the GPU which something a little better.

  • EVGA G3 750W is cheaper. You can also be just fine with a 650W if you'd like to save a bit more.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $249.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler $84.43 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $108.06 @ OutletPC
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $110.88 @ OutletPC
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.00 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $58.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8 GB SC GAMING ACX 3.0 Black Edition Video Card $449.89 @ OutletPC
Case Corsair - Carbide SPEC-06 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case $89.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ B&H
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $98.89 @ OutletPC
Monitor Acer - ED242QR Abidpx 23.6" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $188.87 @ Amazon
Keyboard Razer - Blackwidow Tournament Edition Wired Gaming Keyboard $58.89 @ OutletPC
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1745.77
Mail-in rebates -$105.00
Total $1640.77
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-11 23:24 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC Being bought"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes. Also, from NZXT's website:

Radiator Support:

Front: 2 x 140 or 3 x 120mm with Push/Pull

Top: 2 x 140 or 3 x 120

Rear: 1 x 120

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$4,000 PC Build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

They're incredibly similar. This is from GamersNexus.

https://www.gamersnexus.net/hwreviews/3371-fractal-define-s2-case-review-doesnt-need-to-exist

"The Fractal Define S2 case is the R6, ultimately, just with a lot of parts removed. It’s a stripped-down version of the R6 with some optional reservoir mounts and a new front panel, with rough equivalence in MSRP and ~$10 to ~$50 differences in street price. The R6 and S2 are the most direct competitors for each other, so if choosing specifically between these two, Fractal can’t lose. There are, of course, many good cases in the $150 price range, but the R6 and S2 most immediately contend with one another."

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PC Being bought"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Everything looks good. You'll enjoy using PCPP because it will let you know if you choose something that is incompatible with something else in the build plus, it will only show you compatible parts as you continue to build your list.

The build you together looks good. It's a very high end build so as stated above by SicariusYT, it'll be great for 1440p or 4K gaming whichever you have planned. If your plan is 1080p, it's pretty overkill.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$4,000 PC Build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I would say so. You definitely have the hardware for it and I would see no reason as to why you shouldn't do a custom loop with your current build.

SLI is not really worth it either... Very few games support it and even with the games that do support it, scaling can be weird and in the end, it doesn't provide a huge jump in performance like you would think. With the new NVLink connection found on 2080s and 2080tis, SLI has shown more promising results but the problem is that you'd invest $700+ in order to get an extra 20-30FPS in a few titles.

And don't get me wrong, this is all you. I don't mean to crush your initial plans or anything. I think your idea of a project is super cool. I know I never saw anything like it when I was in school so definitely go for it! I just don't think it's worth your $6,000 especially since it wouldn't result in a NASA supercomputer that can crush games at 4k 144hz maxed out, know what I'm saying? If you were to build an entirely new 'top-of-the-line' PC and spend $3,000-$4,000 doing so, it wouldn't be a HUGE performance gain over your current system. I'd totally understand building a new system if you were running an i3 and 1050ti but you aren't.

If I were you:

  • Upgrade the SSD in your current build. Maybe a 500GB NVME + 1-2TB HDD? All solid state storage maybe?

  • Custom loop.

  • Better case for the loop. Lian-Li PC-O11, Define R6, Meshify C, Thermaltake View or Core P90, etc.

  • RGB?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Is there anything I can do to upgrade an old laptop"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

You're not sure which make/model it is?

Neither of those models have a Thunderbolt 3 port so you're out of luck on the external GPU option. There's pretty much nothing you can do as the vast majority of laptops only allow storage and RAM upgrade options - if any options at all.

On the other hand, even if they did have a Thunderbolt 3 port, the cost of an external GPU enclosure and a GPU puts you pretty damn close to the cost of building a full entry level gaming PC so I may consider that as option instead.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What do you think of my future build https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Kottin/saved/JWfcYJ"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

It'll depend on price but I'd probably go for the MSI personally.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Have a few questions for you Pro's"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Damn, that's a hell of a raffle you won.

You can use both M.2 SSDs. I was under the impression that they use up power from SATA ports not PCIE lanes but I'm probably wrong.

Not really. Just make sure to use a heatsink. That motherboard is pretty high end so I would make an assumption that it probably includes one heatsink for an M.2 drive. The 960s may even come with one themselves. My Aorus X470 board included a really beefy heatsink and my ADATA M.2 came with one as well. Although, the Aorus one is FAR better than what ADATA included.

The 750D is pretty dated. I would suggest the Meshify C for excellent airflow.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$4,000 PC Build"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

So, I guess I'm not really understanding. You pretty much have the best in terms of consumer-grade hardware and I don't even personally see a need to upgrade anything on your current build besides maybe a bigger/faster SSD or something. Sure, you can upgrade to 2nd gen Ryzen but the difference between the 1700X and 2700X is minimal besides a couple of features and a slightly higher boost clock. You could upgrade to a 2080ti which is definitely more powerful than the 1080ti and could probably handle that 1440p165 monitor that you have but that isn't really worth the cost difference if you ask me. Plus, DLSS and raytracing haven't really showed us huge improvements quite yet so again, not really worth the difference in cost.

Personally, I would just save your money (you'll want it for college :p) and upgrade the storage in your current system and if you really wanted to, add an AIO or build a custom loop for it. Considering you'll be going to college, have you considered picking up a good laptop instead? That might have more value to you being in college if you don't have one already.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What do you think of my future build https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Kottin/saved/JWfcYJ"

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

No worries on the 590. I would suggest the WD Blue or Seagate Barracuda for the HDD. Yes, absolutely. The R5 is a great CPU and will be more than enough for gaming, streaming and a bit of editing work if you ever needed to.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What do you think of my future build https://pcpartpicker.com/user/Kottin/saved/JWfcYJ"

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Looks good. I would personally go for a better 7200RPM HDD and you might consider an RX590 if price is similar. It'll have close to the same performance but they're able to achieve a higher clock speed when overclocked if that's something you're interested in.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinion wanted"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Not necessarily for overclocking but just as a better option than the T2. For overclocking, I'd suggest something far more capable like you did below.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Opinion wanted"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

No bottleneck. I used the 8600K with an Asus 1060 and it was a fantastic combo.

Few things,

  • I'd personally stick with a regular HDD over that WD Black just for cost reasons. You probably won't ever see the difference so I'd get a 2TB Seagate Barracuda instead. Also, if you don't need the NVME drive, swap that out for a regular SATA SSD.

  • If you can find a Cryorig m9i for a similar price to that T2, I'd go that route instead. If not, no worries.

  • A 1060 can't come anywhere close to taking advantage of that monitor so I do believe the monitor is extremely overkill. You would need at least a 1080 to take full advantage of that 180hz refresh rate.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $249.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler $27.13 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - Z370 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $163.99 @ SuperBiiz
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $159.95 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $72.00 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6 GB G1 Gaming Video Card $279.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $89.99 @ Amazon
Monitor Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144 Hz Monitor $192.64 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1360.66
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-10 15:02 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Hey I was wondering if anyone has any recommendations for good sales and whatnot to buy parts?"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

You might find some deals for the holidays but you just missed the 'good' ones for Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Definitely keep an eye on Amazon, eBay, NewEgg and OutletPC to name a few.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming pc for 1600 cad."

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Came in under budget so feel free to play around with that. Here's a pretty well rounded system to consider.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600 3.4 GHz 6-Core Processor $225.76 @ Amazon Canada
Motherboard ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $88.96 @ Vuugo
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $151.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage Crucial - MX500 500 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $95.25 @ shopRBC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $67.99 @ Powertop
Video Card Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8 GB AMP Extreme Video Card $569.99 @ Mike's Computer Shop
Case Phanteks - ECLIPSE P400S TEMPERED GLASS ATX Mid Tower Case $109.99 @ Amazon Canada
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $114.50 @ Vuugo
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1454.43
Mail-in rebates -$30.00
Total $1424.43
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-09 11:30 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "1080p 144hz ultra settings pc"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks good.

  • 120mm AIOs have pretty bad value in terms of cost to performance. I would suggest getting a quality air cooler or an actual 240-360mm AIO. A decent air cooler will outperform that H60.

  • The A400 has great value but it is a pretty slow SSD when compared. If you want faster speeds, I would suggest the Crucial MX500, ADATA SU800 or a Samsung 860 Evo if the price is right.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "laptop for software development for less than 700"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

That looks good as well. Same features and specs as the Asus and also has the option to upgrade ram up to 16GB. You'd get the benefit of the 2in1 style laptop with a touchscreen which is nice to have.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "laptop for software development for less than 700"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Out of the two that you posted, I'd probably go with the Asus. Both have very similar specs but the Asus has twice the storage capacity plus, the RAM is upgradeable to 16GB if needed whereas the Lenovo looks like its maxed out at 8GB. Considering you'll be programming and if this is something that you'll have for a few years or more, the option for 16GB of RAM is a big deal if you ask me.

Comment reply on Showgenz's Completed Build: My first build ryzen 7 2700x.

  • 14 months ago
  • 3 points

No need to apologize for doing anything wrong. As long as you like it, that's all that matters. As far as GPU upgrading goes, it'll all depend on what you're wanting. I will say that the 1060 cannot come close to taking advantage of a 240hz monitor and if you wanted to do that, you would honestly need at least a 1080 but preferably a 1080ti or 2080ti even. However, a 1060 is great for 1080p60 gaming around high quality settings so if that's all you want - there's no need to upgrade. I had that exact card and it was great while I had it. I ended up upgrading my monitor from a 1080p60 ultrawide to a 1440p144 monitor so I decided to go with an RTX 2070.

Comment reply on mgkhn's Completed Build: More MSI, More Corsair, so much RGB

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Does it fit properly? I just got the PC-O11 but I've been hesitant on the CoolerMaster mount.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First build NEED opinions"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks great.

  • I ditched the WIFI adapter for a motherboard with built-in WIFI. Saved you quite a bit as well.

  • Unless you'll take advantages of W10 Pro, no sense in paying more for it.

  • Also, the included cooler with the 2700X is quite good so you'll definitely be okay using that.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $329.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte - X470 AORUS GAMING 5 WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard $173.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $274.99 @ Newegg
Storage *ADATA - ULTIMATE SU650 960 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $114.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage *Hitachi - 4 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $94.30 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8 GB Titanium Video Card $424.99 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full 32/64-bit $119.99 @ Dell
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1663.12
Mail-in rebates -$30.00
Total $1633.12
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-07 00:05 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Would this work as a Gaming/Workstation pc?"

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

Refresh rate is how many times the display is able to refresh itself each and every second. This is measured in hz. So, a 60hz panel is able to refresh itself 60 times per second. A 144hz panel has the ability to refresh itself 144 times per second. For example, if you have a 144hz panel but you're only able to achieve 60fps in most games, you're technically only seeing 60hz and not 144hz.

Now, I would personally make the argument that a high refresh monitor does feel a lot smoother when compared to a 60hz but I digress. In most cases, a 1070ti or Vega 56 would be needed to take 'full advantage' at higher quality settings.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YCWZ_kWTB9w

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Would this work as a Gaming/Workstation pc?"

  • 14 months ago
  • 2 points

That looks great. I wouldn't change anything, however, just know that the RX 580 won't be able to take full advantage of that monitor. You'll easily achieve 1080p60 around highish settings though.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Dev/Gaming Laptop"

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

As gorkti200 mentioned, the XPS is always the safe way to go. Great build quality, solid battery life, dedicated GPU, good CPU, fantastic screen, etc. A coworker recently purchased the Aero 15 from my recommendation and while I didn't spend much time with it, it seemed really awesome although I wasn't a very big fan of the keyboard.

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube