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Comment reply on Forum Topic "Building a PC for my mom"

  • 3 hours ago
  • 1 point

The 2700X is currently available on Amazon for $160 and it's an absolute steal if you ask me. Benefits:

  • multi-threaded 8-core faster rendering CPU (does wonders with project completion times)

  • Enough power in the tank to fire up 4K projects if it comes to that

  • Bundles in a very decent RGB cooler which retails for around $25/$30 (that alone makes the 2700X is MUST have)

  • 2nd Gen RYZEN achieves single threaded performance at par with the 9400F and drops it in it's path with 30% faster multi-threaded payloads.

To simplify, don't even bother going the intel route on this one.


For the GPU....this ones down to user requirement. Essentially a GPU will be required as the 2700X is absent of an integrated solution. If the video editing workloads are not GPU-specific there are options available in the $60-$90 realm. Regardless, being the RX 570 is achievable for around $120 and its what you have added above already, i'd stick with it. There are some useful features in video editing applications which makes use of GPU-accelerated processes or third party tool add-ons/special effect previews...hence a solid touching base mid-ranged editing card makes for a solid investment.


A couple of things i'd recommend:

  • Grab a MAX series B450 motherboard. These are MSI revisions updated with larger BIOS chips for 3rd GEN compatibility. Better candidates for 4000-series CPUs too which should be expected the following year. In other words, a more fruitfully feature-rich upgrade path for the long run.

  • To offset some of that cost, drop the 970 evo SSD. Won't have much impact in these types of workflows. Similarly FAST NVME SSDs will run just as effectively with next to zero noticeable performance disparity.

Build eg:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $159.99
Motherboard MSI B450M MORTAR MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $100.00
Memory G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $69.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $61.99 @ Amazon
Video Card XFX Radeon RX 570 4 GB RS XXX Video Card $119.99 @ Best Buy
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $511.96
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-08 20:18 EST-0500

note: the Micro-ATX MAX mobo is currently unavailable. If you're planning on waiting until Xmas before purchasing it would be a good idea to keep this on the tab. The board should cost around $100 although higher demand with short supply could raise the bar here to around $120. Worst case scenario, the regular B450s are good enough and will also support 3rd/4th GEN Ryzen CPUs via a BIOS update (future-proofing).

If you want to save money:

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Help With Upgrading"

  • 9 hours ago
  • 1 point

Depending on what you have already, if you're carrying DDR3 RAM, you'll need to pick up DDR4 with the Z390 platform.

PSU: Corsair CX750, Thermaltake Contac 21 CPU Cooler

PSU sits comfortably with this type of upgrade

the cooler is decent at best for stock performance. If hoping to manually squeeze-up ahead (overclocking) a beefier £45/£55 unit would suffice.

The Motherboard I'm planning on getting: Asus Z390-P

Are you flexible here? there are better boards available ensuring a more robust power delivery plan and a beefier VRM cooling solution. The P variant of the Z390 is one of the most cut-down barebone options in terms of features or I/Os, poorer audio audio quality and uses some cheap quality heatsinks. IMO, the 9700K deserves better to comfortably hit up on it's boost clock potential.

For $25 more, the following 2 boards are stella!

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/QDVD4D/msi-mpg-z390-gaming-plus-atx-lga1151-motherboard-mpg-z390-gaming-plus

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ZwJtt6/asrock-z390-extreme4-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-extreme4

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Can I use an existing SSD with Windows 10 on a new B450 motherboard?"

  • 12 hours ago
  • 2 points

Yes the SSD is transferable but a fresh windows installation is advised to avoid driver conflicts.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "R7 1700x vs r5 2600"

  • 12 hours ago
  • 1 point

Sounds good. I was just having a look at the MC website......The ASUS B450-F is listed for $130 and 2600 for $109, if purchased together = $20 off.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "R7 1700x vs r5 2600"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

RAM is perfect! For 3rd Gen anything within the 2800-3200Mhz range (or higher) keeps the CPU in check! He should be able to push those frequencies higher and throw in some tighter timing controls to squeeze out a little more perf (although not necessary).

For the motherboard, the B450-F does the job. Although personally I'd prefer a newer B450 revised model with a larger BIOS chip. This opens up doors for a more streamlined upgrade path for 3rd GEN Ryzen (or the soon incoming 4000-series). These boards also equip a more robust power delivery plan and a beefier VRM/mosfet cooling solution. a list of these boards can be located here (bottom of the page): https://www.msi.com/blog/msis-max-motherboard-lineup Preferably the Tomahawk MAX ($115) or Gaming Plus ($100). B450-F would also be great if achievable for less but current retail prices puts the board at $130

You could potentially save some cash with a lesser expensive board and pick up a brand new Ryzen 2600X (with the warranty intact). Faster single threaded processor + bundles in a performance savvy cooler. Micro center has the 2600X tagged at $120 (collection basis) and some additional deals open for bundled arrangements including the mobo and CPU for another $10-$30 trimming. Maybe worth checking out if there's a Micro nearby?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Yep, the LPX and Ballistix Elite are top dogs with G. Skills trident/patriot viper/ripjaws equally deserving the limelight. There's a bunch of others which measure up equally but higher binning practices seen on the LPX/BE does show some paper-weight performance gains. How this exactly occurs is unknown (to me, anyway) but the general consensus is pointing towards varied "hardware manufacturing processes". The difference in performance is minimal and for a huge number of use-case scenarios the real-world noticeable gain is non-existent. With today's memory optimisations, especially on the controller end, even the more affordable stuff measures up at an equal footing hence no performance lost. Where enthusiasts may appreciate better binned solutions (which at times occurs randomly) is pushing OC opportunities to the max with higher frequencies and tighter timing controls.

About a year or 2 ago, some of these kits were super expensive. Hence going for lower ranked renowned modules with overclocking in mind was a nice treat to offset some of that cost. Today RAM prices are the lowest we've seen and faster 3200Mhz/3600Mhz kits are now achievable for almost 150% less @ $55-$75. Hence the B-die, higher binned procurement and higher scaled voltage overrides is no longer a pre-requisite for scalable RAM when you can just purchase the desired spec from the get-go. For intel 3200Mhz 16CL is already a blast hence you don't need to worry about alternative options. Granted the LPX still has some advantage and if achievable within the budget i have to admit i'd fancy them (rumour has it: I'm also a sucker for G. Skill aesthetics hence don't mind losing negligible performance gains).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "R7 1700x vs r5 2600"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Both are excellent options

The 2600 scales marginally higher with single threaded performance which is reflective in design elements/manipulations and gaming. Comes with a stock cooler too (assuming this will be included). 2000 series CPUs (2600) also see better optimisations with memory and lesser pertinence to the more expensive B-die modules where the 1700X thrives.

On the other front, the 1700X drops in 2 additional cores offering greater breathing room for system consistency in the long run. Essentially a more powerful chip and will stand taller with the test of time. No bundled cooler may force an aftermarket solution.

Personally i'd bag the 1700X at the loss of negligible game performance returns. A couple of fps lost in games doesn't account to anything in real-world perceptible performance.....where as 8 physical cores of compute headroom is as real-world as it gets with tangible returns. Saying that, if the 2600 adds value with the inclusion of a cooler, we can't fault that one bit as it's simply just as practical.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My SSD isn't very fast for some reason"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Yep if you're getting 5mbps from a 5-20 allowance, that's definitely a bandwidth limitation. Maybe check with your local ISP for an upgraded package as you'd be surprised more is always possible without having to pay more on top, or for a small asking price (seasonal deals, better competitive rates, etc)

There's a bunch of download test clients available to see how well your local setup is working. Something like https://www.speedtest.net/ Just smash the "go" button and let it do it's thing (takes around a minute). You should receive 2 readings, for both download and upload speeds.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

mobo - I was leaning towards the gaming edge AC (wifi, type-c, stuff I dont necessarily need but nice to have for the future). I'll have to check into this one.

Simply put, great motherboard. For the 9700K the 200W cap power pool is more than sufficient for some tough overclocking endeavours.

memory - yeah 2x8 is undoubtedly fine but when I saw OLOy had 2x16's at $99 I fell into looking at 32 gig kits.

That is great value! Paying a little more at this point is purely down to user preference. In my personal opinion, if you're not set on saturating 16GB, 32GB just becomes excess baggage. If workload growth possibilities are likely to raise the bar @32GB in the long run, this becomes a sensible investment.

video card - (looks like)[https://gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvidia-RTX-2060S-Super-vs-Nvidia-RTX-2070S-Super/4049vs4048] 2070s is being used more then its little brother 2060s. Probably the better future proof option. Just a bit pricier. The GPU ratings their suggest the 2060s is a better value buy, heck the 1660s appears to be the best buy ATM but in terms of avg. bench the 2060s eclipses 100% so figured that was all that would be needed. the 10% increment on the 2070s comes at a $100 price bump. worth? idk ha.

For 1080p higher refresh rate gaming, the RTX 2060 SUPER is perfect. You'd only want to consider the 2070 super if targeting 1440p with a 100fps+ target (or pure game performance enthusiasm at 1080p 144fps). You're absolutely right, gaming cards scale terribly with performance when taking cost into account. In other words, already expensive cards seeing even hikier premiums for loosely driven performance gains - sucks! My usual opinion is "buy what best compliments your performance targets and spend less.....and look for gaps in the market for good re-sale value for an earlier upgrade path (a few years)". The 2060 super perfectly aligns with that notion!

case - yeah nzxt has cleeeean cases. thank you for explaining the difference! I was looking at the nzxt kraken AIO coolers and lots of reviews mentioned terrible CAM software. I don't know what CAM stands for but good to know this! I've been looking at Fractal Design as well specifically the Meshify C. Related to me that it has great temps due to the mesh front. And helps it looks quite clean as well.

CAM is basically NZXT's implementation of a "software" controller. Basically once you've got your corresponding hardware installed (AIO, RGB fans, etc) you can download CAM from the NZXT's support page. The app offerings the following:

  • a very nice user-friendly monitoring tool which is helpful to view temps, CPU/GPU loads (etc), storage utilisation, fan speeds, etc etc

  • RGB controller (essentially software based controls to manage your hardware RGB elements). Excellent SYNC controls to unify RGB configuration across matching hardware parts.

  • enables FPS counters and other in-game overlays

  • Pump (AIO) and Fan configurations (setting speeds)

  • Overclocking (I wouldn't touch this side of things even if my life depended on it - safest OCing method is always at the root level via BIOS/UEFI tweak configurations).

  • and a couple of other features which I can't recall (or i don't bother making use of)

Good luck mate :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 1 day ago
  • 2 points

Perfect! Solid selection of parts :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "My SSD isn't very fast for some reason"

  • 1 day ago
  • 1 point

Sounds more like a patch client/network download limitation or the WIFI playing up.

Download and run something like Crystal Disk Mark (SSD/Storage benchmarking). https://crystalmark.info/en/software/crystaldiskmark/ Compare the results with the SSDs ranked speeds to see if things are running in their optimal state.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

oh crap I forgot "CAD" hehe

A quick revision....it's a bout between 3 available options (according to PCPP): https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/products/monitor/#r=344001440&P=2&A=1&sort=price&page=1&D=120000,240000&X=271,699999

I always recommend viewing user feedback from mainstream sales channels and independent reviews. In this regard, the LG panel holds truer to the greater asking price but fails to impress per user feedback. Which leaves the Dell and Acer in the final - it's gotto be a knock-out per preference....but once again being both are excellent panels, let the feedback audience add some perspective :)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming & Streaming PC"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $160.00
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $239.99 @ Best Buy
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $939.91
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 12:04 EST-0500

Essentially for a gaming rig, if you're able to achieve 60fps on 1080p displays (or any resolution), you've got yourself a solid gaming machine. The previous build boasting a 3700X + RTX 2070 SUPER is more leaning towards higher refresh rate gaming where performance enthusiasm invites higher premiums (cost) for a not as justifiably higher performance (fps). Whereas the revised above build easily shoots past the desired 60fps @ 1080p mark with plenty of performance in the tank for 120-140fps in lesser demanding games or 80-90fps in more demanding titles on ultra game configurations. In other words, even after trimming the CPU/GPU to 2700X + GTX 1660 SUPER combo, you've got plenty of juice in the tank to fire up modern day titles with zero concerns for performance loss. Games will look just as good!

Other changes:

  • A B450 motherboard which is more than adequate for a 2700X and open to a 4000-series CPU's if you're looking to upgrade in the coming years. The board is equipped with essentially all the features or I/Os one would expect hence no loss in performance here.

  • A more affordable case - excellent value option.

  • A more affordable and adequately placed PSU. You don't need the very best to fire up a gaming/streaming build and the Corsair CXM is considered one of the best options available in the market around it's asking price.

Another worthy discussion point:

There are 2 methods to achieve a simultaneous gaming and streaming workflow:

  1. Stream encoding via CPU resources (or software encoding). The encoding process uses up CPU resources for streaming content which can have a 15-30% performance hit on the gaming side. Although the larger performance hit is undesirable, software encoding does offer more versatile streaming options but better quality live uploads.

  2. Stream encoding via GPU resources (or hardware encoding). The encoding process takes place on the GPU via a dedicated encoding chip. This in return sees lesser performance hits in gaming (8-12%) but stream quality is restricted to high quality 720p 60fps or basic quality 1080p 60fps (which is fantastic if you're starting out on youtube, twitch, etc etc).

The above second option requires a more powerful RTX GPU with the likes of a RTX 2060 SUPER/RTX SUPER. If this is the desired option, here a second build plan with a 6 core CPU + RTX card:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $139.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 Gaming Plus MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $99.99 @ B&H
Memory G.Skill Aegis 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $54.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Newegg
Video Card NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB Video Card $399.99 @ Best Buy
Case NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair CXM 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1044.90
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 12:25 EST-0500

(this can be brought down to around $1000 with a budget case, a Ryzen 2600 and maybe even $55 SSD @ 500GB with the idea of upgrading to more storage later)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

If you're looking to push up on 1440p ultra-wide, the following 2 options are fantastic:

  1. 120hz 4ms IPS GSYNC: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/c9qbt6/dell-aw3418dw-341-3440x1440-120hz-monitor-aw3418dw

  2. 144hz 1ms IPS GSYNC: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/CzrmP6/lg-34gk950f-b-340-3440x1440-144-hz-monitor-34gk950f-b

Pricey but I believe you'll be more than willing. A third option, if you fancy something backed with white and slim bezels: https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/new-alienware-34-curved-gaming-monitor-aw3420dw/apd/210-atzq/monitors-monitor-accessories (2ms 120hz)

For the 2080 TI either the 144/120hz is more than adequate. You won't be able to tell the difference between 1ms-4ms response times either hence feel free to choose either of the above.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What would be a good Ryzen alternative?"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Question on memory; will this one be ok (already ordered but can return if needed): https://pcpartpicker.com/product/Cf98TW/gskill-memory-f43200c16d16gvkb

For $60 it's a nifty piece of kit - keep it. Essentially, anything hanging around 3200Mhz 16CL for 2nd GEN Ryzen is a perfect balance of data access speeds and bandwidth for Ryzen CPUs. In other words, a solid buy!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming & Streaming PC"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Something like this delivers on every level in terms of visual quality, game performance (FPS), streaming versatility (assuming the max target is standard quality 1080p 60fps streams), VR, etc.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $309.99 @ B&H
Motherboard ASRock X570 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $163.79 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Gigabyte GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB WINDFORCE OC 3X Video Card $499.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $98.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit $109.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1465.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 10:59 EST-0500

It really does boil down to the budget as other options are available for either a more affordable rig (Ryzen 2700X + RTX 2060 SUPER) or something a little more versatile with a 12 core Ryzen 3900X for greater encoding possibilities / higher end GPU should performance targets exceed the throughput of a RTX 2070 SUPER.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "$2200+ rig need the your opinion on if these parts are worth getting?"

  • 2 days ago
  • 2 points

Can't fault this one bit! Nice selection of parts


Purely preferential:

Comment reply on DatNopeLegend's Completed Build: Third Gen Miracle

  • 2 days ago
  • 2 points

Build looks fantastic!! The GPU RGB/LED element is a perfect finishing touch for an all-round corresponding theme. I've seen this sort of build pop up several times without the unified eye-candy but user input, part selection and fine-tuned settings (colour) plays a significant role....in your case...."SPOT ON"! +1

P.S. I have the same cooler and RAM sticks (all 4 dimms populated). The cooler tube fittings sit against the RAM modules with some light pressure. This is perfectly safe (if you want to revert back to the pumps original installation position). Either way, no complaints, doesn't rob the builds aesthetic appeal one bit :)

I was meaning to ask - i've put together probably over 5 NZXT builds in the last few years (including my current gaming one). Most of them were locked into the CAM software with corresponding NZXT RGB fans/leds (either via the the HUE+ hub or the case's pre-installed smart hub). Problem being, the CAM software is far from flawless and ended up dealing with a number of issues. I'm just wandering what your experiences are with the current software patch and Smart hub V2? I'm hoping some of that riff raff has been ironed out as I've got my eyes set on the H710 and already have several NZXT RGB fans to play with.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Gaming & Streaming PC"

  • 2 days ago
  • 2 points

I want to buy parts separately but people told me about them arriving "doa". Why does that happen?

that's a little odd - i've never heard that one before. I've been purchasing parts separately and together since man first landed on the moon without any issues. Maybe just another folklore from least lucky ones.

Whats the budget?

Does the budget include peripherals? (display/keyboard/mouse/etc)

Operating system required? (Windows)

Gaming display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 60hz/144hz/etc)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Advise for motherboard CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3400G"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

So if I pick up one of these boards, install CPU , power up , will this boot so I can get to Bios flash screen?

Generally you'd require a previous GEN chip to update the BIOS prior to installing the newer 3400G.

Alternative:

Pick up a B450 revised motherboard with a larger BIOS chip. These will run the 3400G without the hassle of BIOS updates. A list of these models are located here at the bottom of the page: https://www.msi.com/blog/msis-max-motherboard-lineup

If you need help choosing one:

  1. Budget?

  2. Is the case a Micro ATX or a Standard ATX?

  3. Any specific features required?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

BRACE YOURSELF and FASTEN YOUR SEAT BELT for the motor mouth wall-text hijack lol. I'm bored and my Mrs says "you talk alot". I've tried improving myself but I can't help it.....so here goes:

I have never overclocked, but I'm not against it. I plan on utilizing this rig for frequent gaming and for office work.

From the outset I would have strongly recommended going the 3rd GEN Ryzen route for best value and additional compute performance via multi-thread support (the better future-proof investment). Seeing you're interested in overclocking, intel 9000-series definitely makes sense. If the OC-endeavour falls on its butt let me know.

CPU - great deal, close in effective speeds to i7-9700k at a fraction of the price.

Clock frequencies are only one factor which determines how well a CPU performs. The second being, number of cores! Already we are seeing a number of excellently nippier clock speed performing quad-core CPUs from previous GENs showing signs of retirement in a select number of gaming titles. Whereby lesser performing 6-core CPU's (with SMT enabled) are offering better versatility in system consistency and higher returns in low-1% FPS returns. Today games are being quickly optimised for 8-core CPUs and already DX12, Microsofts official hardware communicator is scaling on 8/12 cores - something game developers will follow suit. Console games are also setting standards here as 8-core resourced CPUs is an absolute requirement. In other words, current mustered higher clockspeeds are great but if you're looking for a smooth performance-rich sustainable build for the "long run" (tangibly invested future proofing which is around the bend already), you might want to consider the following options:

  • AMD Ryzen 3600/3600X. Essentially 6 physical cores + SMT enabled for 12 thread 30-35% more multi-threaded compute performance. Much better option opposed to a single threaded i9-9600K which held some ground prior to the 3rd GEN Ryzen launch. I guess it is what it is, the 9600K is finally more reasonably priced and for an overclocker it is tempting but if you're looking for something for the long-haul, you'll want something with greater resource capacity (more cores/threaded support)

  • AMD Ryzen 3700X. 8 cores + SMT. Future proof safe-haven

  • or, if overclocking is a requirement, the i9-9700K. Single threaded + 8 cores. Gets a little pricey but does run a little faster whilst securing 2 additional cores. Even without multi-threaded support, 8 physical cores are abundant for modern demanding games and should last very comfortably for many years to come.

The cooler might be a bit premium but I want the CPU to last as long as possible and likewise have a cooler that truly lasts.

If you're looking for reliability, durability + acoustic performance (quieter) - you'll want to the Liquid heatpipe cooled air cooler route. AIO's and premium air coolers deliver the same performance (perf diff -/+ 1-2c difference either way). If you fancy sticking with an AIO from an aesthetics point of view, go for it! Although I will say - the H100i is loud. You might prefer the Corsair H1151i Pro which trims the noise levels almost by half using more premium fans: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/W6RzK8/corsair-h115i-pro-554-cfm-liquid-cpu-cooler-cw-9060032-ww Otherwise, if "reliability and noise levels is of concern for the long run", and assuming overclocking is an absolute, grab the Dark Rock Pro 4: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/F3gzK8/be-quiet-dark-rock-pro-4-505-cfm-cpu-cooler-bk022 (or Noctua D12)

Want something that will future proof the build. RAM - not planning on doing 2 2x16 ram sticks - can't decide if I want to pony up the $50 for a really beautiful stick or go flat $100 for a good price.

For gaming and general use you don't need anything more than 16GB (unless specific mem-intense workloads suggest otherwise). Hence 2x8GB will suffice very nicely. The savings here should be directed to the CPU-side of things.

Storage - I like these options as solid bang for buck.

Excellent storage unit! Lesser performing units will deliver the same performance for this type of workload but for $8 more the HP EX 920 is a steal of a deal!!

Video card - 2060S looked like a solid 8gb video card that would last a long time.

Always a tough one as it's purely down to user performance targets. Generally speaking, the RTX 2060 SUPER is an excellent card for 1080p higher refresh rate gaming or 1440p and spending $400 already on the GPU alone is enough not to warrant more expensive recommendations. Just keep in mind, if your display is locked on 1080p 60hz, you'd be better off with a $220 GTX 1660 SUPER/TI.

Case - no idea. I like nzxt's clean look.

I'm a big fan too :) ...and currently running a NZXT s340 elite, H500 and was very close to picking up a H700 last year to replace the S340.

The only veto being, I would avoid the "i" variants which come with a smart hub for your fans and leds... The smart hub locks you into NZXT's proprietary CAM software which is the buggiest and most annoying piece of software i've experienced to-date. You'd be better off using the motherboards controller with a universal fan hub (if required). This case: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/6Cyqqs/nzxt-h510-atx-mid-tower-case-ca-h510b-w1 ($30 less without the smart hub - again contributed to the CPU side of things).

PSUs - I'm trending towards G3, SeaSonic or possibly Corsair at 750 preferably 850W which is more than I need I'd like it for future proofing and ensuring no power issues.

You'd be surprised, the build as it stands won't consume more than 350W's of power or 400Ws in a worst case scenario. Therefore even a 550W unit will suffice for overclocking or upgrades. A good overkill approach here would be a 650W unit for around $100. Again savings to the CPU side of things :)

The G3 is basically an EVGA G2, but downsized for a more compact smaller casing. As a result, the G3 houses a smaller fan which ramps up with undesirable noise-levels, delves in to a more close-knit compact arrangement (runs a little hotter) and sees some of the finer protection features seen on the G2 compromised. One of them being power over-loading. 2 years ago some of these discrepancies didn't matter as the G2/G3's were available on the cheap, almost $20-$30 cheaper than similarly classed units (i got mine for £37 less compared to the Seasonic Gold plus / Corsair RMx - hence a bargain!). It kinda fell flat on its face though - the noise levels alone were enough to drop the G3 in exchange for a G2. Even back then the Corsair RMx was a front runner alongside the Seasonic focus plus series hence a little regret proceeded.

A newer contender (actually the oldest and most reputable manufacturer whose products are actually licensed by EVGA, and other major brands) is the FSP Hydro G. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/qxcMnQ/fsp-group-power-supply-hg750 750W for only $107. The benefit being, excellent performance + "flat cables" for easier cable management under those PSU shroud tighter spots. Stiffer cables are a struggle hence this unit is a life-saver IMO. Otherwise the Corsair RMX 650W/750W unit.


OK....$1500 woolly soft cap + overclocking potential....

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $369.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $88.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard Gigabyte Z390 AORUS ELITE ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $175.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Flare X 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Storage *HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $108.99 @ Amazon
Storage *Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.99 @ Newegg
Video Card NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 SUPER 8 GB Video Card $399.99 @ Best Buy
Case *NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1431.88
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 08:40 EST-0500

If you're targeting higher resolution gaming (1440p/etc) or fancy a little push on 1080p higher refresh rate gaming (hitting closer to 130-144fps in demanding games):

  • Beefier aftermarket RTX 2070 SUPER GPU

  • $50 cooler with a 2-4c difference in thermal performance and simply the best value unit available for overclocking.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i7-9700K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $369.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler Thermalright Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $49.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte Z390 AORUS ELITE ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $175.98 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Flare X 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $59.99 @ Newegg
Storage *HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $108.99 @ Amazon
Storage *Seagate Barracuda Compute 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $49.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $529.99 @ Newegg
Case *NZXT H510 ATX Mid Tower Case $69.98 @ Amazon
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1522.79
*Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 08:45 EST-0500

Let me know your thoughts! Feel free to suggest your preferences. Even if you fancy sticking the 9600K.... it's still a fantastic CPU for gaming and I guess it would make sense if you ended up going down this route for an earlier upgrade path (a few years in the least).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PNY CS3030: Should I pull the trigger on it?"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Nice!

My first ever purchased pre-built was a Dell (maybe 15 years ago) which although was a fantastic build for the purpose of use but vastly limited in the feature/expansion department. So it's nice to see Dell incorporating desirable possibilities for users.

BTW i was just looking at the CS3030 reviews. Looks great too! Pretty much the same spec as the MP510 hence feel free to opt for either unit. For gaming my vote sticks with the 660p from Intel for a few dollars less and zero-performance discount with gaming workloads.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

I have no issues with the RTX 2080 TI. Over-priced card but if I had this sort of spending power I'd grab one too for the intended performance target :) As long as the larger spend reels in tangible performance gains it's always worthy of consideration. The same does not apply to the 3950X, unfortunately. For gaming and photo editing, the added performance advantages remain with the 9900KS. Alternatively you could opt for a Ryzen 3700X and then upgrade to something better in 2020 with AMD's 4000-series CPUs (i believe will be available in mid-2020). The 3700X will deliver the same performance as a 3950X in these types of workflows which are lesser core count contingent.

....i want that full 4k high res look .....

Were you looking for a recommendation for the display?

Also are you open to 1440p ultra widescreen? Or is 4K a confirmed requirement?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggestions I plan to mainly play overwatch,minecraft and apex"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

oops I forgot to mention... I wouldn't bother with intel CPU's unless you're planning on overclocking. This year AMD has pretty much stolen the limelight or pulled the rug from under intel. Essentially 3rd GEN Ryzen is delivering on par performance with the inclusion of multi-threaded support. Furthermore the AM4 socket is open to another upgrade path which will see CPU's launching towards the end of 2020. A more future-proof solution. Where intel at stock marginally gains advantage is single threaded speeds but in all fairness the performance gain is not enough to overturn the AMD proposition.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggestions I plan to mainly play overwatch,minecraft and apex"

  • 2 days ago
  • 1 point

Great budget for a gaming build!!

If you're targeting 1080p gaming @ 60fps (assuming your display may be locked at 60hz), the following for a $1000 would do the job very nicely:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock X570 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $163.79 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce GTX 1660 Super 6 GB SC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $239.99 @ Best Buy
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $98.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1010.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 05:49 EST-0500

At this point an AIO cooler is optional. Personally I prefer air coolers with liquid heatpipes as they run quieter, last longer and are far more consistent with reliability.


SECONDLY:

If you're targeting 1080p 144hz for higher refresh rate gaming, a beefier GPU is achievable without crossing the $1500 threshold

Eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 3600 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $189.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition 42 CFM CPU Cooler $34.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock X570 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $163.79 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $529.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $98.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1300.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 05:56 EST-0500

Keep in mind, if you rather save money there are the more affordable options for higher refresh rate gaming: RTX 2060, RX 5700, RTX 2060 SUPER, RTX 2070 and RX 5700 XT (in performance order)


THIRDLY:

As you are probably aware already, DX 12 and a handful of games are already utilising 8 cores for gaming. You may appreciate a 8 core CPU for a more durable system (future proofing). This can be achieved either via opting for a intel i7-9700K or a Ryzen 3700X. Preferably a Ryzen 3700X on a platform which will see further upgrades in 2020. This is achievable within $1500.

I've left the cooler out as the 3700X bundles in a pretty decent stock cooler (wraith prism). Feel free to opt for an aftermarket solution, if desired.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 3700X 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $309.99 @ B&H
Motherboard ASRock X570 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $163.79 @ SuperBiiz
Memory Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $74.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial P1 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $99.99 @ Amazon
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB XC GAMING Video Card $529.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design Meshify C ATX Mid Tower Case $98.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply FSP Group Hydro G 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $107.98 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1385.71
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-06 06:01 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "PNY CS3030: Should I pull the trigger on it?"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Sorry i'm not familiar with Dell proprietary motherboards. Does it support an M.2 SSD? Also keep in mind the M.2 slot does not define to NVME x4 PCIe performance, as these slots can either support x2 SATA driven devices or x4 NVME. Not that it matter really as SATA driven M.2 storage devices are similarly priced.

Anyway,

for gaming and general use you don't need the fastest NVME as it won't be saturated with this type of workflow hence something like this for $55 would be an absolute treat: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/xpYLrH/crucial-p1-500gb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-ct500p1ssd8 (don't let synthetic benchmarks sway the reality as these tests are based on workstation class workloads which are non-aligned with gaming or the day to day - naturally for gaming the 660p will deliver at par with the CS3030 or any other more premium offerings).

If you want something as good or as durable as the CS3030 but more affordable. grab this one: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/nGzkcf/corsair-mp510-480gb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-cssd-f480gbmp510

Keep in mind you don't need to worry about endurance unless sequential read/write workflows are part and parcel which are more aligned with workstation class builds. We're talking about massive GB's of files or a ton of smaller data packets being written to the drive on a regular basis. If this is a concern, the Corsair MP510 is built like a tank with a 800TBW endurance package. All that whilst my crappy entry level 250/350TBW traditional 2.5" SSD bought in 2015/16 for gaming, editing workloads, rendering, etc is no where even close to saturating it's life-line. It's got another decade to go before I chew it all up....actually it's now stored in a lesser used system for the family....we might be in the year 3025 before it hits the empty bottle.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Any suggestions I plan to mainly play overwatch,minecraft and apex"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Unless you're getting a GTX 1060 6GB graphics card on the cheap ($100 or so) it may be a viable option. If you're looking at current retail prices in the $200-$300 domain - it's a definite NO NO. Newer GPUs for around $200-$250 deliver anywhere around 15%-30% better performance. Something like a GTX 1660 (10-15% gains) / GTX 1660 SUPER (25-30% gains).

For a complete recommendation, whats the total budget? and your local currency (eg. GBP/USD/CAD/etc)?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

For best performance without compromising performance in any area based on the suggested workloads, something like this would work better by a long shot:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i9-9900KS 4 GHz 8-Core Processor $659.99 @ Memory Express
CPU Cooler Corsair H150i PRO 47.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $174.98 @ Amazon Canada
Motherboard ASRock Z390 Taichi ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $319.99 @ Newegg Canada
Memory G.Skill Trident Z 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $272.99 @ Newegg Canada
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $139.99 @ Canada Computers
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $274.99 @ Newegg Canada
Video Card Asus GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card $1599.00 @ Canada Computers
Case Lian Li O11D XL-X ATX Full Tower Case $247.06 @ Mike's Computer Shop
Power Supply Corsair HX Platinum 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $169.99 @ Amazon Canada
Case Fan Corsair LL120RGB LED (Three Fans With Lighting Node PRO) 43.25 CFM 120 mm Fans $99.99 @ Newegg Canada
Case Fan Corsair LL120RGB LED (Three Fans With Lighting Node PRO) 43.25 CFM 120 mm Fans $99.99 @ Newegg Canada
Case Fan Corsair LL120RGB LED (Three Fans With Lighting Node PRO) 43.25 CFM 120 mm Fans $99.99 @ Newegg Canada
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $4158.95
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-04 22:10 EST-0500

The storage arrangement entirely depends on your requirement. I've stuck in a fast NVME for the OS, applications, asset-libraries and active workloads (although 500GB is more than sufficient) and a second 2TB overkill NVME consumer unit for storing games, archived catalogues, backups, etc. Obviously the games library or catalogue size may warrant higher capacities which can come in SSD form (assuming you're willing to spend) but again third-tiered storage requirements have very little impact on performance hence higher capacity hard drives for cheaper are also an excellent possibility (again if you want to save money).

This may be useful - if you're targeting 1080p 144hz gaming, the RTX 2080 TI is also overkill with no real tangible/perceivable returns. The 2080 TI is more suited for 1440p ultra pixel count and 4K displays and if this is the targeted resolution then just ignore this comment.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

Oh crap - i also overlooked the cost of the 3950X??? $1749 is a big NO NO. The launch MSRP is $700/$750 USD dollars. Possibly around $900 CAD. These chips are difficult to locate at the moment due to lack of availability hence the amplified asking price which is simply "day light robbery". Avoid at all cost!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

3950X crushes intel in specific multi-threaded workloads which are sensitive to more cores (16 cores to be exact with the 3950X). If your workload is not capable of utilising these additional cores, you end up with a CPU only using half of it's potential. The Ryzen 3700X/9900K series CPUs are perfectly in line with your specific workloads, whereby the 3700X will deliver the same performance as the 3950X and the 9900KS will beat both the 3700X/3900X in a whole host of single threaded comparisons (incl. gaming). Keep in mind, photo editing tools are strongly suited to higher binned single threaded advantages and in most cases multi-thread payloads are non-existent. You're essentially getting 10-12% better ST performance going the intel route (which is reflective in games too unless you're targeting 4K as your displays native resolution).

I just like the dominator kit with the corsair AIO and fans.

ok. But 64GB does seem excessive. 16GB is sufficient for gaming (32GB possibly a future-proof investment but not one with any significant performance gains). 64GB for photo editing is only practical if you're working with "bulk" 8K raw images with specialised formats via higher resource manipulating applications with the likes of Lightroom. Put it this way, I deal with 20mb-160mb images in PS/LR and on the most part I hardly exceed the 16GB mark. There's been the odd occasion with some 200-300mb file types which cross over the 16GB barrier hence 32GIGS of RAM does have some desirable appeal for future-proofing (esp if you're running a ton of background processes which is true in my case).

Anyway i guess it's down to your use-case and preference - for what it's worth it's a functional build and fully compatible.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First build question"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

I guess so...

Maybe hook it up to your TV or something and see if it posts.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "2020 Custom Loop"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

For " Gaming, Photo Editing, daily use" the 3950X is pointless. At best games can stretch up on 8 cores, photo editing is more edging towards 4 core higher single threaded performance and general use is unlikely to shift past 2 cores. In other words you don't need anything beyond an 8 core CPU and you'd be better off with a faster single threaded $500 i9-9900KS if you want the very best in it's class.

I don't know what to make of some of the other selections. It almost appears as if you've gone and selected the most expensive parts with the assumption "cost defines performance" which is far from it. 64GB RAM for gaming and photoshop? $1100 for a total storage package of 6TB storage? etc..... If cash is no object I guess you have earned the "overkill" if it's absolutely desired but if you want to save money without compromising performance there's a ton of savings possible.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Changing out power supply help."

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Nope never mix cables with different branded PSUs - you could potentially fry your parts. Mixing cables with the same tiered PSUs from the same brand is possible (not always). This is an area you'll want to seek confirmation from the source (manufacturer).

In other words, use the cables supplied with the EVGA 850W unit.

I put a 750 watt corsair in my new build. It seems to be a little under powered.

A list of your parts would help to determine whether this is correct. For the vast majority of build arrangements (general use, gaming, rendering, editing, etc etc) 750Ws of power is overkill! You'd have to be using a higher core count lesser efficient CPU and/or multiple-GPU arrangement to saturate 750Ws.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Motherboard Selection for Intel i5-9600k"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Ideally the higher tier boards are more of the enthusiast range unless specific features or additional I/O functionality is an absolute requirement. A build targeting "gaming" and "office work" can easily prolong pure satisfaction with a mid-tiered series board as it's simply got you covered with all the "must-haves".

Unless you can point out specific requirements, both the ACE + AORUS Ultra are more edging towards "extreme overclocking". A decent mid-tier board can achieve similar performance, excellent thermal packages and more than sufficient power delivery arrangements. With a 9600K, a lesser demanding CPU opposed to it's 8-core hyperthreaded bigger brother (9900k series) would very comfortably support a mid-tier platform (likewise the 9700K).

Mid-tier options:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/ZwJtt6/asrock-z390-extreme4-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-extreme4

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/GPdxFT/gigabyte-z390-aorus-elite-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-aorus-elite

Or a more affordable higher tier board if you desire one:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/TnhKHx/asrock-z390-taichi-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z390-taichi


Personally I wouldn't bother with a 9600K and push for a 9700K for more discernible future proofing. Hence saving a little on the mobo side of things for a 8 core CHIP makes sense. In fact here in 2019, unless "overclocking" is an absolute MUST, i'd be more leaning on 3rd GEN Ryzen CPUs. More-so if the idea is to game on higher resolution displays with the likes of 1440p/4K. At 1080p, intels single threaded performance does stand marginally taller hence worth the effort for some.

Seeing that some boards have M2 slots that 'share' and or disable SATA ports. Preferably I don't want to deal with any such boards.

Honestly this should be the least of your concerns as these boards consist either of 6/8 SATA ports. Unless you're intending on populating the build with an equal number of SATA devices, this shouldn't be a problem. You don't need to do anything different other than check the mobo manual to see which port is disabled and just avoid that one when adding SATA devices. BTW, all consumer boards carry the same compromise so no secondary option here.

For a more concise recommendation, create a parts list on PCPP and share it and confirm the following:

  1. Budget?

  2. Display resolution and refresh rate? (eg. 1080p 144hz)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "16GB for 3700X - B450 Tomahawk Max"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

This baby: G.Skill Ripjaws V 16 GB DDR4-3600

3600Mhz 16CL holds true on the Tomahawk MAX. I've had the pleasure on working on a similar build but with a Ryzen 3600. The XMP presets enabled the rated spec with immediate effect. Problem being, after a BIOS update to get a taste of faster OS load times, the modules capped out around 3200Mhz. This was easily resolved via manual tweaks (DRAM voltage over-ride + 3600Mhz adjustment)

Keep in mind, the heatsink height on these sticks can hinder CPU installations depending on what you're targeting. Some beefier cooler options may not offer sufficient clearance for taller sticks. If you're sticking with the stock Wraith Prism cooler - no problem, otherwise double check clearance compatibility.

Comment reply on Djbenxnyc's Completed Build: Captain Phasma

  • 4 days ago
  • 2 points

nah the mirror shine wouldn't have done it for me (yep i'm making it all about me lol and i don't like too much bling bling) IMO, the finish achieved is astoundingly, exquisitely, elegantly picturesque.....and not to forget with a pinch of a classically "vintage" FINISH!

6 hours of work paid-off nicely +1

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Blue-sky / dream machine: Evga "Dark" Build / 2080Ti XC2 (Sub $4500ish)"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

What do you think of the CPU on that mobo?

I want to run 1440. I have this monitor: https://www.amazon.com/Dell-Alienware-Monitor-Resolution-Overclocked/dp/B0777RY75V/ref=sr_1_4?keywords=alienware+34%22&qid=1575420103&sr=8-4

I was wandering whether the 2080 TI made sense for this build. With that (1440p ultra) demanding display resolution it absolutely makes sense (although these are pricey cards).

Your display is sublime - the envy of my eye :) I was actually thinking of upgrading to something similar but as usual always holding back considering cost.

You're basically in the "higher resolution" gaming category with thicker pixel densities stemming from a 3440x1440 pixel count. For gaming this somewhat changes things in the CPU/mobo department unless single threaded supremacy enthusiasm suggests otherwise. Essentially, with higher resolution gaming you're going to achieve the same game performance with a cut-throat Ryzen 3700X which is going for only only $300. At best the 9900KS may draw in a few extra FPS pointers but for non-perceivable performance gains and an added premium of $225, for me personally the 9900KS is simply not justified. Where the 9900KS will see more deserving advantage is single threaded tool manipulations in audio production workloads but nothing too extravagant to beg a $225 asking price. You'd be better off grabbing a 12 core Ryzen 3900X to boost audio rendering speeds as these types of workloads are higher core count savvy. Also fantastic for heavier multi-tasking whilst gaming or running simultaneous productions projects on the go.

Dropping some of the "Overkill", without compromising performance but adding valuable gains in specific workloads, here's where I'd be: (keeping the EVGA theme in check, ALTHOUGH mobo possibilities suggests otherwise)

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 9 3900X 3.8 GHz 12-Core Processor $499.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler EVGA CLC 360 74.82 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $150.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI MEG X570 ACE ATX AM4 Motherboard $319.99 @ Newegg
Memory G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $273.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $114.97 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $204.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $1149.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT Phantom 530 (Black) ATX Full Tower Case -
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA P2 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $159.99 @ Best Buy
Optical Drive Pioneer BDR-209DBK Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer $74.99 @ B&H
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $139.99 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3089.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-04 19:25 EST-0500
  • $1200 savings and an equally robust build

  • For Storage i've thrown in a fast 1TB NVME for the operating system and applications. For audio production workloads you'll want to run all active projects on this drive and archive/backup completed projects to the secondary drive. For the secondary drive, also thrown in a 2TB NVME as these are very reasonably priced and you're spending power is adequate to drop spinning/louder hard-drives all-together. If you need 4TB, personally I'd opt for a more affordable HD but performance enthusiasm may fancy a 4TB SSDs which are achievable for around $400.

  • In my opinion titanium PSU's are way-over-rated even for long-haul tasks with only a 2% increase in efficiency. I rather pay a little extra on the electricity bill on an annual basis opposed to spending half a grand on a PSU. Platinum units are also a little overkill for gaming and the "possible" audio production workloads (assuming you're not going to be running long-haul job-lots 24/7)....but.... far more reasonable in terms of cost. Hence added the EVGA PT series @ 750W (more than enough wattage power for this sort of build - more as in overkill already).

  • I admit the corsair dominator RGB RAM modules look nice. But are you willing to pay around $200 more for RAM aesthetics? Performance wise, the G-Skill 3600Mhz 17CL is on par and in my opinion if you fancy some RGB, these are the best looking sticks on the planet.

  • As for the motherboard - the EVGA is way is way over-priced and is more edging towards custom liquid cooling arrangements. Not sure whether they've sharpened up on the BIOS config, but a couple of years back the limitations were poor, updates were lacking relevant optimisations and the user-experience with some of the OC technicalities were awful. I'm sure at this price range some of those hindrances have been set aside but I'd be more leaning on the more renowned brands with the likes of MSI, ASUS, GIGABYTE and ASrock where product maturity scales very nicely with excellent performance, more convenient user experience + easier UI in BIOS with a ton of configurability. If you end up sticking with the 9900KS, judging from the reviews online (just checked today), the "EVGA Z390 DARK" does pass with flying colours hence nothing of note to be concerned about (although i'd recommend looking further into user feedback before pulling the trigger).

  • Last but not least - the case! I'm not sure about this one (left it as it is). With powerful components in a build with the likes of a 2080 TI + 9900KS/3900X, i'd be more leaning towards a more "airflow friendlier" case. Essentially something that doesn't hinder the extraction of air with the likes of either well-perforated vents/openings (eg. NZXT H700/H710) or a full meshed out frontage (Eg. Fractal Design Meshify C), amongst other options. The phantom 530's stack of drive cages and lack of intake is a hindrance to airflow. Furthermore, the acrylic glass side panel robs the "premium" appeal whereby Tempered glass is desirable. You might even fancy a PSU shroud for a cleaner finish. It's definitely not a bad case and will run fine with this sort of arrangement as it does tick several other boxes but IMO there are better options available. Since case selection is a subjective dept i'll leave this one to your discretion.


Of if you absolutely desire going the 9900KS route with the initially selected EVGA DARK Z390, you can still save plenty of money:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU Intel Core i9-9900KS 4 GHz 8-Core Processor $524.99 @ Best Buy
CPU Cooler EVGA CLC 360 74.82 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $150.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard EVGA Z390 DARK EATX LGA1151 Motherboard $499.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3600 Memory $273.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $114.97 @ Amazon
Storage Intel 660p Series 2.048 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $204.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 11 GB XC ULTRA GAMING Video Card $1149.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT Phantom 530 (Black) ATX Full Tower Case -
Power Supply EVGA SuperNOVA P2 750 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $159.99 @ Best Buy
Optical Drive Pioneer BDR-209DBK Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer $74.99 @ B&H
Operating System Microsoft Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $139.99 @ B&H
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3294.88
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-04 19:52 EST-0500

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Memory won't run higher than 2133mhz?"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

I'm less than psyched about the idea of transferring everything over to a new mobo. Still, if there's no other way, that sounds like the way I'm going to have to go eventually

What you could try is "manually" configuring DRAM voltages and raise the frequency - providing you're comfortable with overclocking. Raising DRAM voltages may also force down-volting or setting an off-set on CPU voltages (on these particular older board models) for stability. The trick is to down-volt to a reasonable rate without either losing performance or only trimming a narrow drop in CPU speeds (which won't have any/much noticeable impact in gaming performance). It make take several tries to get things in balance or it may not work altogether.

2133 vs. 3200 sounds like it will have a pretty dramatic performance increase.

Yep - keep in mind, although the modules are capable, several external factors may hold you back @ 2666-3000Mhz - which is equally beneficial as Ryzen demands faster speeds.

Is the board you recommend likely to last me a good 3-5yrs?

In terms of reliability/durability, way more than 5 years unless unexpected hindrances occur (same applies to all mobos)

In terms of upgrade-path, no, all current compatible AM4 sockets will see their last upgrade in 2020 with Ryzen 4000-series CPUs.

My case should support a standard ATX

You'll want to double check..... lol A couple of years ago I accidentally purchased a Micro-ATX Fractal Meshify C case when the intention was a reg ATX. I'm still recovering in 2019.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Upgrade from ryzen3 2200g to ryzen7 3700x"

  • 4 days ago
  • 1 point

Compatible via BIOS update. Keep in mind, it is an entry level board and may run a little hot and may compromise boost clocks from reaching rated speeds. Then again the 3700X is rated at 65W hence no major concerns other than pre-applied voltage overrides which can get a little on the heavy side (something manual tweaks can easily address).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Blue-sky / dream machine: Evga "Dark" Build / 2080Ti XC2 (Sub $4500ish)"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

You might fancy an EVGA 360mm RAD: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/s3FKHx/evga-clc-360-7482-cfm-liquid-cpu-cooler-400-hy-cl36-v1 Although you may need to switch the case to accommodate one. The 9900KS boosts up on 5GHz on all cores and as expected runs hot. A 360 RAD will lessen fan cycles for a little quieter ops.

I know Im wasting money on a couple things here.

PSU, RAM, SSD are overpriced.

For the SSD, you might be interested in NVME M.2 drives. 3/4x faster performance. Whether your workload can benefit or not, these are more reasonably priced. Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/88bwrH/hp-ex920-1tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-2yy47aaabc or you could even double up to 2TB and still save money, eg: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/LxXnTW/sabrent-2-tb-m2-2280-solid-state-drive-sb-rocket-2tb

Practically the same performing RAM @ 3600Mhz 16CL are achievable for as little as $150-$200 - with the added bonus of tighter timing controls for superior performance. Eg. https://pcpartpicker.com/product/w3FKHx/gskill-trident-z-neo-32-gb-2-x-16-gb-ddr4-3600-memory-f4-3600c16d-32gtznc Obviously, the design/aesthetic element may vary by preference but having a hard time to digest the cost of the Corsair Dominator Platinum

PSU - the build as it is will barely touch on 400/450W. 650W/750W already being a plausible overkill. Even 850W is more than sufficient if you were to drop in a second GPU. 1600W is out of this world! The added premium for the Titanium efficiency banding is pointless too unless you're running the build 24/7 non-stop for some electric bill relief.


If you don't mind me asking, whats the build for?

If gaming, what are you pairing up with the GPU in terms of display resolution and refresh rate? Eg. 1080p 144hz

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What would be a good Ryzen alternative?"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

Ignore the compatibility error. It's a mistake on the PCPP's part. The newer MAX motherboards are fully compatible with 2nd and 3rd GEN Ryzen CPUs.

Manufacturers official spec/compatibility sheet: https://asset.msi.com/pdf/main/global/presale_v2/B450-TOMAHAWK-MAX?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build in a While - Intel Gaming/Audio Editting"

  • 5 days ago
  • 2 points

For an already purchased build - stick with it.

Specs-wise, it's a solid performer for gaming. All the parts perfectly compliment one another and nothing is short of quality/performance. With a K-modifier CPU, the AIO cooler may be a little overkill at stock but easily lends hand to overclocking possibilities.

As for the display, this ones down to user preference. Some competitive gamers will prefer 1080p with display refresh rates exceeding the 144fps limit. Hence your current model will suffice as it's capable of hitting 144-240fps. 1080p panels are still fantastic for gaming and place lesser demand on GPU resources opposed to 1440p higher resolution panels. These greater rendering demands are in excess of 35/40% hence 1440p, although does offer better visual quality, reduces FPS performance.

As for the Display model itself, i'm not familiar with this unit nor do I have any long-standing experience with any 240hz panels.

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Recommendations for new Mobo/Cpu/Ram"

  • 5 days ago
  • 2 points

I just use the PC for word processing, internet surfing, and occasionally playing Tiger Woods 2008 :)

Ideally, A $70-$90 4-core CPU is sufficient for this sort of task. But agreeably, a 6 core multi-threaded 2600/2600X with cut-throat prices is a difficult one to pass. Especially if you're open to more demanding gaming content later or just fancy something which is open to long term possibilities.

It essentially boils down to your budget (?)

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is this CPU compatible with my mother board"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

With a 9600 K-modifier CPU, the following compatible options are worthy of consideration:


BTW - if you don't already own the 9600K and aren't looking to overclock, have you considered going the Ryzen 3600/3600X route? Essentially very similar single threaded performance but adds 6 additional threads for faster multi-threaded compute performance (the better future proofer).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "First Build in a While - Intel Gaming/Audio Editting"

  • 5 days ago
  • 2 points

The parts are shown as already "purchased". I'm assuming this is incorrect?

If none are purchased, whats the budget (incl. display)?

Is 240hz gaming an absolute must or are you open to the sharper image (higher resolution) 1440p 144hz displays?

Comment reply on Forum Topic "is this CPU compatible with my mother board"

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

Not compatible.

The best available CPU for these 200-series boards is the i7-7700K. The downer being a new 7700K is simply not worth the asking price unless achievable for considerably less (via the used market).

Comment reply on Forum Topic "What would be a good Ryzen alternative?"

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

For faster software encoding - Ryzen's value plan with multiple cores and multi-thread compute performance takes the win. This type of arrangement would require a discrete graphics card as higher core count Ryzen processors do not support integrated graphics. This is where the "value" turns a little ugly as you'll be forced to spend more for a graphics card.

If you're supporting single 1080p 60fps encoded streams (or lesser demanding performance targets), the intel i5 path with integrated graphics is simply more than adequate with plenty of juice in the tank. Either of the following 2 options will suffice: i5-9400 ($130) or for 12-14% faster single threaded performance, the i9-9600K.


THE ALTERNATIVE SOLUTION (incl. discrete graphics card)

Seeing you're willing to fork out around $700 for the build, a faster multi-threaded CPU with discrete graphics is achievable "for" less:

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $119.99 @ B&H
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $54.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston A2000 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $54.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GT 710 2 GB Video Card $53.00 @ Amazon
Case Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case $61.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Corsair
Case Fan ARCTIC ACFAN00119A 56.3 CFM 120 mm Fan $8.27 @ Amazon
Monitor BenQ GW2480 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $99.00 @ Adorama
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $637.20
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-02 21:10 EST-0500

Or, if your software based encoding fancies something a little more robust with 8 cores + multi-threading for the long run (encoding process flexibility to higher quality output or higher resolution streams) - The Ryzen 2700X is achievable for only $160 and comes bundled with a pretty decent stock cooler. Eg.

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $159.00 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI B450 TOMAHAWK MAX ATX AM4 Motherboard $114.99 @ B&H
Memory Team T-FORCE VULCAN Z 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $54.99 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston A2000 500 GB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $54.99 @ Amazon
Video Card MSI GeForce GT 710 2 GB Video Card $53.00 @ Amazon
Case Phanteks P300 ATX Mid Tower Case $61.00
Power Supply Corsair CXM 650 W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-modular ATX Power Supply $69.99 @ Corsair
Case Fan ARCTIC ACFAN00119A 56.3 CFM 120 mm Fan $8.27 @ Amazon
Monitor BenQ GW2480 23.8" 1920x1080 60 Hz Monitor $99.00 @ Adorama
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $675.23
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-12-02 21:14 EST-0500

Keep in mind, a dedicated GPU also opens up doors for multi-display arrangements (if that's something you might fancy in the long run).

BOTTOM LINE: For a $700 encoding/streaming build - the 2700X + GPU is a blast!

Comment reply on Forum Topic "Need opinions with this build"

  • 6 days ago
  • 2 points

So you think this aftermarket gpu is better than the founder?

Absolutely!!

It is always likely to achieve better performance with respectable aftermarket solutions as the primary purpose behind partner cards is "improvements". What the EVGA card does immensely better is that chunky 3 pcie slot towered heatsink which does a wonderful job with heat dissipation. A cooler card resorts to lesser ramped fan cycles, ultimately lowering acoustic levels for quieter ops.

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