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NVME v Sata SSD for Editing

jonnypb
  • 1 month ago

I know for day to day operations you won't notice any speed enhancement on a NVME SSD over a 2.5" Sata SSD. But for tasks such as video editing is it a worthwhile upgrade and something that you would notice?

Read 2400 MB/s and Write 1750 MB/s on the NVME as opposed to Read 560 MB/s Write 530MB/s on the Sata SSD?

Comments

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Really the only time it would matter is if you were using it as a scratch drive only (Google it if you don't know what that is) and even then it would depend on the rest of the PC if it could really use the speed or not.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Depends on the size of the files being moved and if time matters when your moving the files.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

It's going to be for putting together 1080p GoPro footage, nothing professional.

Hadn't really thought about a scratch drive as it's just family footage. Was just going to have a 500GB NVME SSD for OS and programs and then have another SSD to store data on.

Would also get some cloud based storage for backups.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Same answer would depend on the rest of the parts if it would even matter or not.

For your just average user nothing fancy a 7200 disc drive is fine.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

You might notice if you had the two side by side. For casual usage I wouldn't worry about it. If you're doing a lot of large videos, and especially if time is money, then go NVMe.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Bullsnot you don’t notice. 3500mbs read vs 500 MB’s read makes a huge difference in every task on Windows. Sure in an artificial and theoretical environment you shouldn’t notice but all you have to do is boot to see the difference.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

From experience, I disagree. And those are only for sequential reads.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

While I'd certainly disagree with "every task on Windows", video editing should involve reads more than long enough to matter. I'd certainly spring for a NVMe for this application.

Note that this is almost entirely about "large transfers". You don't need the fanciest NVMe device, just one that has a PCIe interface and high transfer rates (being fast in other cases gets expensive). Also this summer NVMe was often cheaper than SATA (I needed to buy a SATA drive for my mom), although solid-state memory prices seem to have gone up since then.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Loading programs relies on the IOPS of the drive more so than the sequential read speed. 4k random read is the metric to look at as with programs the drive needs to locate many tiny files. Say you get a 15-20 second boot on a SATA SSD going to NVMe would usually net 10-15 seconds boot. If going by sequential read only being 7x faster then you would expect windows boot to be only 2 seconds which we all know doesn't happen.

As for loading programs/games the results are usually the same too where there is diminishing returns on the speed boosts. If you are copying large files like videos then the NVMe SSD will be much faster assuming where you are moving it from/to can also keep up with that speed.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

i guess i just have a different experience im currently booting linux and windows from 2 different nvme ssds and 2 different sata ssds and its noticeable in everything from boot times to downloading files to installing os's. i would go as far as to say the difference between my 2gbs nvme vs my 3gbs nvme isnt very noticeable.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

As I've related here many times, I do a lot of database work on a machine with a 970 Pro and some SATA SSD's (MX500's). Very I/O intensive, and while yes the 970 Pro is a bit faster, it's nowhere near what the paper difference in sequential read speeds would indicate. I can generate somewhat artificial situations where the NVMe drive is subjectively quite a bit faster, such as large sequential file copies, but that's not something most people do all the time.

(I don't know about boot times because I reboot my machines as rarely as I can get away with, given my need for running relatively recent linux kernels.)

In any case, given that the OP has stated that it's for relatively casual hobby use, I can't suggest to him that he spend (much) more for an NVMe drive. Pricing vs SATA is a lot closer than it used to be, but SSD prices are on the way back up for a while so it's hard to say what will happen.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

With 1080p compressed video SATA SSDs should be fast enough but NVMe is much more competitively priced now than it used to be 3 years ago. Unless you are doing 4k footage you may not notice a difference between SATA vs NVMe SSD while editing.

Using the drive as a scratch disk for video editing is one of the uses where NVMe can really shine depending on the program/workload. Say you are working with 4k raw video and got clips from 20 different videos and you are going through the timeline making edits. As you are going through the timeline the program has to keep loading the video as you go as you are likely not going to have enough ram to hold 500gb-1TB or even more of raw 4k video. Having a fast NVMe SSD that can read over 3GB/s reads (Sabrent Rocket and Samsung 970 evo to name a couple) really can make your workflow much smoother. Though that is assuming your CPU can hold up with it as well. (hello threadripper)

Being used as a scratch disk also means you don't store anything on it except the work you are currently working on. HDDs have the best price per GB in storage still so they are the best for storing video and are plenty fast for video playback. If you do decide to get a NVMe get a well priced performance NVMe and don't pay the Samsung tax on the higher priced NVMe ssds.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Thank you all, very useful. So if I were to use a scratch drive would my setup look something like this assuming that I only have 1 NVME in n the mobo.

SSD - OS and programs NVME - Scratch drive SSD or HDD - Storing Videos

Thank you

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