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Really, really, really dumb cooling idea

Linventor
  • 3 months ago

Ok, hear me out. What if you got a custom loop, but you had, under the desk, as the main water tank, this. Like, everything is hooked up to it through individual pipes, so you don't have stuff like the exhaust water of the graphics card going through the CPU's cooler. I haven't the faintest idea how well this would actually work, and I'm in no position to find out, which is why I'm sharing this idea here. Thoughts?

Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

It's how it used to be done that's why many cases still have holes to route tubes outside of the case.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Good idea in thought, because as stated it takes a lot of energy to heat up water, so a larger tank means a lot longer time to heat up. However, right now with a good custom loop the limiting factor is not the temperature of the water in the loop, but the heat transfer from the CPU chip to the heat sync itself. The CPU die is a small area and you can only transfer from a small area like that so fast. This is the reason that larger CPU, such as Ryzen's EPIC CPU, have a large number of cores, a high TDP, but with a large area are much easier to cool.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, if the main problem is surface area, then what if you had something like this? Basically an extended socket, with the CPU contained within a waterproof covering. You have all the I/O stuff going through one main pathway, and water flows around the socket. This'd result in a much higher available surface area than the current system, without any downsides that I can see. Of course, I'm not an expert in this stuff.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Something like that might work, but the engineering required to do it would simply not be worth the rewards. Even with liquid nitrogen you are only looking at maybe a 20% performance increase over a good water cooling solution, and that is going below the ambient temperatures which this solution would never do.

  • 3 months ago
  • 0 points

No one would do it because of the illogical extra money and labor. Plus, now you have a tank under your desk to cool your PC.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I wasn't thinking about what it'd take to put it together, but how well the finished product would work. Water has a very high specific heat, so It'd seem like this kind of thing would be incredibly effective. But then again, I haven't done any research on water cooling.

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