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5x write speed with 1x the performance

Gress555

3 months ago

Looking to upgrade to SSD for my main drive, not just my OS drive. Was looking at M.2 vs SSD. M2 has around 5x the read and write speed of an SSD, yet load-times in games and for OS boot is pretty much exactly the same. Why do people use M.2 drives so frequently, outside of professional workloads such as I guess video transfering?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V3AMz-xZ2VM <-- HDD vs SDD vs M.2 comparison

Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 3 points

Because it is 5x faster with sequential read and write performance. Nothing wrong about that. So if you had 2 M.2. NVMe drives an transferred a 200GB mp4 file between them, it would be 5x faster than transferring a 200GB mp4 between 2 SATA SSD's.

However, games don't benefit from sequential read and write performance as when you load up a game, you load up hundreds or even thousands of smaller files. The performance when you load up a game is based on random read and write performance which is only very slightly faster on an M.2. NVMe drive.

  • 3 months ago
  • 3 points

Why do people buy NVMe drives? mostly because the price has come down to basically match m.2 SATA drives, and come close to 2.5" SATA; and the m.2 form factor lets you install a drive right on the mobo without fooling around with mounting or power and data cables.

It used to be that the price gap between 2.5" SATA and m.2 anything was massive. That gap has largely disappeared, at least at the lower end (QLC NVMe), and the low end parts are plenty good enough for gaming and general use.

edited to add: and the other posters are correct that the NVMe speed advantage is mostly on paper. Even at SATA speeds, you need a large transfer for the transfer time to be a significant part of the total operation time; I/O setup, issue, and teardown takes almost as long as the transfer. And yes, lots of I/O is actually random rather than sequential. In my work, I can see the NVMe advantage doing database load testing, and to a lesser extent when working with mass file transfer such as pulling a new build client. Doing ordinary interactive stuff, it's indistinguishable from my SATA SSD's.

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

m.2 is just a form factor, not a measure of speed. people use m.2 drives because they think they are faster then sata ssd, when in fact they boot windows the same speed. the only real reason you choose m.2 over a 2.5" ssd is for sff builds or if your workload can benefit from nvme.

To sum it up: m.2 is a form factor, people choose a m.2 drive because they assume it is faster and get tricked by a placebo affect.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I see, but in the case of the SSD vs the M.2 drives being used in that video, the read and write speeds of the M.2 drive were around 4.5x faster than the SSD being used, yet performance was still the same. I just can't really understand why people buy them, is M.2 just the """GAMING""" ram of storage?

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

People see that it is fast in synthetics and think that it is fast in real world performance, as i said, it is the placebo affect

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

the read and write speeds of the M.2 drive were around 4.5x faster than the SSD being used, yet performance was still the same.

I think it's theoretical synthetic benchmark speed vs actual real world use.

I just can't really understand why people buy them

IMO some combination of A/ epeen. B/ some folks gotta have "the best" even when its only a theoretical advantage.

But given how prices are now... my next ssd will prolly be a m2 of some kind.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

They are faster when they get going on a large file (throughput). The real issue here is what humans see: seconds. When you move from a hdd to any ssd even a ssd on sata2 (did one a while back, way faster) its much faster and you see your boot take less than half the time (roughly) and you say wow that is sweet. When you click on a desktop icon poof its loaded. When you move to a fast NVME its slightly faster but not much, because you already got rid of most of the seconds you wait. What is left is partly drive speed and all the other stuff that happens before the drive does anything. Boot does things with the bios and MB only part of it is loading things off the drive. The drive only speeds up that part. My new PC with a 2400G and gammix s11 480 on win10 boots in 17 seconds to login, 6 seconds from sleep. The sata2 ssd win7 core2quad takes 30 seconds to boot, the vista hdd Athlon x2 takes 1:05.

Like said the M.2 are near the same price as a sata ssd, so why would you get a slower drive? In the future PCs always get slower, so its future proofing. Its easy install no wires and compact. I only spent more on my S11 drive so it can stay there for 5 years or whatever and I don't have to clone a new drive/etc. I built this spring but I would agree in that even a cheap Nvme like the Intel 660/sabrent/etc is going to be fine and super fast in seconds for any normal user. I would have gotten a larger 1gb of those had price been what it is now. All that said sata3 ssd is pretty fast and not a bad choice, but if M.2 Nvme is same price and you can use it what is the point.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I just ended up getting an NVME drive since it was cheaper than an SSD for the same capacity anyways x) Thanks for all the replies <3

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

The M.2 can be a bit faster, and I recently bought both a 1TB SATA SSD drive (for my mom's laptop that can't take M.2) and a 1TB M.2 NVMe. The NVMe was cheaper, and I guess roughly the same reliability.

And sometimes I do have long sequential reads...

[comment deleted]

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