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Powersupply and circuit breaker question

KangaRoux

7 months ago

Hello! I have a 1300w evga power supply in my current PC and I was wondering how worried I should be about tripping my 20amp breaker. I also have a second old alienware 18 laptop that I use a as a dedicated streaming pc and between 2-4 out of my 6 monitors on at a time ranging between any combination of a one of 2 standard monitors, 4k,, 4k 144hz, 1440p 144hz and 27 inch ultrawide 120hz. I also have a 3D printer and multiple game consoles, lights for streaming/videos and other small miscellaneous items that may draw power like a printer, phone charger, and my internet modem/router and such. Im of course not using everything at once but how do I know about how many things I can have in use before it gets overloaded? Example: during stream I will have both my PCs going, maybe 2-4 monitors and a ps4 or a VR headset running as well as some lights.

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

What matters is the actual power draw, not the maximum rating of the power supply. If you want to find out how close to the edge you are, without actually tripping the breaker, your best bet is to get a wattage meter ("Kill-a-watt" or similar meters) and find out how much power you're actually pulling from the wall under load.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Great, thank you!!! I will try that.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

As mentioned above, the "actual power draw" is what matters. I'd almost certainly expect that the EVGA power supply has power factor correction [PFC] (required to sell in the EU, more or less required to avoid tripping a 15A [US standard] breaker). As long as you have more-or-less working PFC, the Amps you draw will be the wattage used divided by the voltage (without power factor correction things get hairy).

The "right" answer will take the kill-a-watt device, but here are my guesses: monitors: low draw (especially with LED backlights) PS4: 120W, 140W peaks (according to google. I'd expect PFC here as well). printer: high if laser (they operate via heat), low if inkjet. 3D printer: pretty high (anything that uses heat to operate eats power), but probably not more than a laser printer. VR headset, similar to monitors.

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