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How to convince parents that I should build a computer

gigglepig_buster

6 months ago

This is not VS prebuilt, jut in general. They think that I would just use it for gaming and it would be a time suck. I think that it would be a good experience to build it, and I could do homework on it. What are some other points I ould bring up?

Edit: spelling

Comments

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Are you using their money, or your money? If it's your money, you should be able to do whatever you want with it. Best thing is to be completely honest with them, if you will use it for gaming, tell them you will use it for gaming, but if homework is also an argument, document all the times you had to use a computer for homework or all the times you could have used one to make your work better.

If it's their money buying this system, its completely up to them though, just present your argument and hope for the best. If not, time to get a job and earn some cash. Even if you're under whatever the minimum working age is where you are, mowing lawns, car washing, raking leaves, etc are all things people hire kids for all the time.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Mostly my money, and thanks

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

While I partially agree, a parent does have the right to restrict what their child owns, regardless of the source of the income used to purchase that item. That being said, a computer is incredibly useful and restricting ownership of one would be foolish, IMO. More appropriate would be restricting time to use the computer for entertainment.

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

This is true. When I was growing up my parents got me gaming consoles, on the condition that I would only play when I didn't have homework or other work to attend to, and I would split my time between gaming and outdoor/recreation time. Gaming was certainly a privilege.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Well building it would take an afternoon and the cost of entry "for the experience" isn't as compelling as you might think. I expect you already have a computer in the house for homework? If so, that really undermines that argument.

I mean regardless, sure, you wouldn't just use it for gaming. But you would end up gaming a lot and maybe they don't like the idea of that. Hard to say not knowing your parents and their feelings about video games. Invariably at some point you'll probably want to use it more than your parents think you should, whether they're right or wrong, that's the cross children have to bear.

I'm not against you or anything either. I just grew up with parents who would say similar stuff, who were a bit controlling, and would run me through the wringer over nothing quite a bit. And what I can tell you as that at the end of the day you and your parents are not peers, you aren't equals (yet) and despite logic, reason, or fairness they can still say no just for the hell of it because they don't want to deal with this new variable in the house.

If they've already decided in their hearts there might not be much you can say to get them to come around. A possible outcome you should be prepared for. Sometimes the only solution is to get older.

I wish you luck though. I never had a PC in the house growing up. I still ended up being a software developer, such was my interest. So it won't be the end of the world. I hope your parents aren't stubborn jerks. Or that you don't end up running amok if they do come around and prove their point (I mean I don't know you after all, but maybe your parents do which might be why they've taken the position they have).

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

“I could do homework on it”

I know a lot of people who have said this before. Really, it’s the best excuse out there unless you can do some programming. Speaking of: Java can be real fun.

I think the big thing is to just not lie. Tell them completely honestly your intentions. If they say no then, it will be the best outcome anyway.

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