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DatPanMan

3 months ago

recently i found had that many games that i want to play require a x64 bit OS and i have a x84 how in the world do i downgrade it and not have to some sketchy website

Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

What are you running now? Do you have a Windows 10 license by any chance?

Side note: It's more of an upgrade. You'd be running 32 bit right now and would need to completely reinstall with the correct version.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

this isn't a down grade actually.

you are currently running a 32 bit operating system, you need to run a 64 bit operating system.

i too would like to know what you're running currently and if you have a windows 10 license

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

^^ an x84 OS system means it's 32 bit, systems physically cannot be 86 bit unless it has bits that are disabled (it goes by binary 2 4 8 16 32 64 128)

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

systems physically cannot be 86 bit unless it has bits that are disabled (it goes by binary 2 4 8 16 32 64 128)

Well that's not absolutely true, https://stackoverflow.com/questions/28307240/why-is-the-adressspace-increased-from-32-to-36-bits-with-pae

The amount of bits addressable by the system doesn't have to be neat multiples, it often is sure. Older x86 CPU's being 16bit, and subsequent revisions being 32bit and later 64bit.

For example, 48bit CPU/Systems listed: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/48-bit

So an 86bit system isn't impossible, no one running Windows is using anything but 32 or 64bits of course, and realistically probably 64bits unless they're running something ancient.

And OP's use of x84 is a typo, it should be x86. Probably the most confusing thing for laymen is the usage of x64 and x86, which is probably better represented by x86-64 and x86-32, but lots of people have settled on the shorthand x64 and x86 respectively. Because reducing the number of characters by 50% is sooo valuable. And of course laymen who aren't up to speed on x86 as an architecture description, but also being used to signify 32bits in software, sometimes, are bound to make mistakes or assumptions about the meaning of x86 and x64 respectively.

Frankly, I wonder if a 32bit OS is the least of the OP's problems. If his system is old enough to be running a 32bit OS upgrading to a 64bit OS might be fine, only to discover that's not the only system requirement he's missing.

[comment deleted]
  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

It would be a upgrade, 32 bit to 64 bit. And to do so you would need to completely reinstall Windows. Also 32 bit Windows has been basically non existent for a long time (since most software that is "requires" 32 bit can be ran on 64 bit and only old legacy software has that issue) so I'm guessing you have Windows 7, I never heard of anyone having 32 bit Windows 10. Since I'm assuming you have Windows 7 you might as well upgrade to 10 now since MS is ending support for 7 after this year iirc.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

i know i have windows 10 and i dont know much about OS things and what a lincnce is and its X84 bit it says its in system details

  • 3 months ago
  • 2 points

It's x86, which is often used as a synonym to represent 32bit when used to describe software.

x86 is foremost a description of the CPU's most PC's run, CPU's that are compatible with the original 8086, which evolved to the 286, 386, 486, Pentium, and so on to the current AMD Ryzen and Intel Core CPUs.

In the mid 200's CPU's moved from 32bit to 64bit, which was represented as AMD64, IA-64, x86-64 etc. And depending on who you're getting a program from they can represent 32bit and 64bit versions as x86-32 and x86-64 respectively. Microsoft among others has settled on x86 to represent 32bit and x64 for 64bit, when referencing software. Which once you know all that it's fine, but certainly not crystal clear to everyone who's trying to interpret them for the first time.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

Frankly reading and interpreting your post, my biggest concern is that upgrading to a 64bit OS might not be the only requirement you're not meeting.

Either you mistakenly installed 32bit version yourself, or your system is old enough where a lot of games aren't going to run. I don't suppose you would be willing to post your complete system specs.

At any rate, if your running a version of Windows you can download the 64bit version of that from Microsoft and use your existing Windows license. No need to get other websites involved. You did mention you were running Windows 10, so I'd just go download the 64bit version of that from Microsoft directly. You already have a license for Windows 10, so there shouldn't be an issue.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I also have that with a PC if I understand right, its a vista AMD 64 X2 but oem put 32bit windows on it. Problem is it has a fake sata that is really IDE so it can't talk to the drives, and can not use SSD. So while I have run 64bit linix on it before just fine, its not worth trying to upgrade which is a full install. And it likely can't run win10 that well anyway plus will be stuck on a hdd. I'll figure out what to do with it once my new PC is built. I thrashed it for over a decade, I can't complain one tiny bit, and it still browses ok but of course I usually use one of the other PCs lol.

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