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why is amd cpu usage lower than intel's?

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Topic

leocreyes10 6 days ago

I'm researching to build my first pc and looking a lot of benchmarks, usually see in many different cpu comparisons that cpu usage is always lower on amd cpus than intel's, but fps are higher on this last one.

why is that ocurring and should be i worried for running a game at 90% load on intel? is it any better to play at 40% load with amd but less fps?

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Allan_M_Systems 7 points 6 days ago

Really depends on which CPU's you're comparing here...

If we were to observe, say, an i3-8100 vs a Ryzen 3 2200G, both 4C/4T CPU's, I think you'd see very similar "utilization" either way.

When we move up to comparisons where core or thread count isn't equal, we begin to see discrepancies in "load" because gaming workloads don't scale to many-threads perfectly. Another issue, is that the way load is measured on CPU's with hyper-threading/SMT, is often misleading. A single thread of a SMT/HT enabled core at 100% saturation may only "appear" to the tool measuring load, to be 50% load for that core, when in fact, it's more likely to be ~65-85% load for that core.

Consider for example, going from an 8600K to an 8700K. Both Intel parts with 6 cores, but the 8700K has hyper-threading enabled. If a game is "loading" the 8600K to 75%, that same load on the 8700K will likely "appear" to be ~40% according to a hardware monitor, even though, in reality, the load is closer to 60%.

It's very common to wind up comparing an Intel part without HT to an AMD part with SMT enabled (or an Intel part to an AMD part with more cores) because dollar for dollar, AMD packs more cores/threads. This will often lead to the load appearing much lower on the AMD parts. While there is some truth to the load being lower on a part with more cores/threads, it's often "exaggerated" by a measuring mechanism that isn't quite right.

With all that being said here's some pointers for picking a CPU:

  1. Pick a CPU with enough cores/threads so that there is always more than you actually need. This will help ensure predictable, consistent performance in games with minimal stuttering. Some games run smooth on 2C/4T, some need 6C/6T or better to run smooth. Do some research on the games you want to play.

  2. Pick a CPU with fast enough cores to run the games you want to play at your desired FPS goals. Some games run at 150FPS+ on any modern CPU so you can get away with just about anything. Some games are very compute intensive and/or not well optimized and need really fast cores to run at high FPS.

  3. If budget isn't too much of a concern, and you just want something really good for gaming and not have to worry about picking the "right" CPU, the 9700K and 9900K are flagship gaming CPU's that will run anything really well. The Ryzen 2600X and i5-9400F are really good value gaming CPU's under $200 that will deliver 70-90% of the performance of the flagship options for less than half the price. The Ryzen 7 series CPU's are great value options for gamers who want to deliver high quality, CPU encoded streams of their gaming sessions live.

leocreyes10 submitter 1 point 6 days ago

Thanks you, your comment was very useful and informative.

Specifically, I'm opting between core i5 8400 and ryzen 5 2600x You could see on youtube that intel's cpu runs at better fps but its load is always close to 100% on the other hand, amd's cpu runs at 40% - 60% range but lower fps

I've got a little extra money for upgrading the cpu, but haven't found any better deal than this two, where could i see a trustworthy list of intel cpus performance?

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 6 days ago

In this specific comparison, there is a discrepancy caused by BOTH the fact that the 2600X has SMT enabled while the 8400 does not, but on top of that, the mechanisms that measure load for an SMT enabled CPU are exaggerating the discrepancy by understating the true load on the 2600X.

In reality, that 40-60% range on the the 2600X is actually 60-80% load, while the it-8400 is probably running ~80-95% load in the same games/conditions.

Either of these CPU's are great choices for gaming.

https://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/Intel/Core_i7_9700K/12.html

The 2600X will have more "spare" compute headroom for background tasks, while the 8400 will tend to achieve slightly higher performance. Either direction has merit.

Tetsuclaw 5 Builds 1 point 5 days ago

Specifically, I'm opting between core i5 8400 and ryzen 5 2600x You could see on youtube that intel's cpu runs at better fps

If it helps LTT came out with a video you might find very interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SEszLdXMMu4

Gilroar 1 Build 2 points 6 days ago

Specifically, I'm opting between core i5 8400 and ryzen 5 2600x You could see on youtube that intel's cpu runs at better fps but its load is always close to 100% on the other hand, amd's cpu runs at 40% - 60% range but lower fps

Allen answered that.

A single thread of a SMT/HT enabled core at 100% saturation may only "appear" to the tool measuring load, to be 50% load for that core, when in fact, it's more likely to be ~65-85% load for that core.

The load is never evenly balanced and as soon as any of the cores max out whether the SMT threads show it or not you stop gaining performance.

So seeing a 60%-40% loads looks good but if those are on the same core you are actually running 100%.

darkboi725 1 point 6 days ago

so im trying to find parts for my pc build on pc part picker. i am trying to make a pc with a nice upgrade path (AM4) but im having compatibillity issues with Asus - PRIME B450M-A/CSM Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard and amd athlon 200GE so partpicker says i rly dunno whats up with that if someone knows whats up please tell me

Gilroar 1 Build 1 point 6 days ago

It is generally better to start a new thread to ask a question then post in someone else's topic.

But to answer your question. AMD and motherboard manufacturers massively oversupplied the market so most boards out now are older products and not compatible out of box with newer versions of the CPU/APU.

You would have to contact the retailer and see what BIOS version the motherboard ships with and if they could update for compatibility with that APU.

BobTheBuilder66970 0 points 6 days ago

Also matters if you overclock. Overclocking kills the cpu faster.

macetotheface 1 point 5 days ago

...Wut?

[comment deleted]