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Topic

UltraNoob123 5 days ago

I am going to buy a ryzen 5 2600 and is planning to overclock it to 4 Ghz will the Aorus b450 pro good enough or should i get a x470/x370?

Comments Sorted by:

kschendel 1 Build 6 points 5 days ago

That B450 will be fine.

Even the lower end B450's would probably work, as long as you have some airflow moving past the board's VRM area.

Granddy 2 points 4 days ago

Yea. Those b450 boards seems to be better than the previous b350 boards in terms of overall quality.

mark5916 2 points 4 days ago

All B450 chip-set boards (ATX or mATX) have 4 CPU phases.

If you want to go higher than that, you must consider a X470 chip-set board.

But with a good air cooler and a decent B450 board, you should be able to overclock an R2600 processor.

From there, the overclocking potential depends from the quality of the CPU die.

UltraNoob123 submitter 1 point 4 days ago

4 phases?

mark5916 1 point 4 days ago

Yes what have you expected? lol

UltraNoob123 submitter 1 point 4 days ago

Srry, but if you couldnt tell by the name im not a pro when it comes to pc stuff

mark5916 1 point 4 days ago

Never mind.

B450 chip-set boards are not high end boards.

But you can still overclock a processor with such a board.

UltraNoob123 submitter 1 point 4 days ago

Do you think it will limit me or is it going to do just fine?

bucketofcrud12 2 Builds 1 point 4 days ago

All B450 chip-set boards (ATX or mATX) have 4 CPU phases.

ummm, are you sure about that? I can think of one off the top of my head that has 8+3 phases. that would be the Gigabyte B450 Aorus Pro Wifi. if you dont believe it, here is a link to a tomshardware article: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gigabyte-b450-aorus-pro-wifi,5705.html

mark5916 2 points 4 days ago

Then someone should write a letter to Jacob Terkelsen and inform him that this board is advertised as a 8+3 phase board but in reality it has 4 phases for the CPU and 3 phases for the IGP or IMC

It uses a Intersil ISL 95712 PWM controller that can go as high to drive 4+3 phases at best.

https://www.renesas.com/br/en/products/power-management/pwm-switching-controller/multiphase-controllers/device/ISL95712.html

Also it uses...

Four CPU phases are used, which are each formed by one 4C10N (high) and two 4C06N (Low) mosfets.

And 3 SOC phases namely one 4C10N (high) mosfet and one 4S06N (low) MOSFET from ON Semiconductor.

Lastly each CPU phase are using double the inductors.

8 inductors for the CPU and 3 incductors for the IGP, thus the false advertised 8+3 phase configuration.

https://imgur.com/a/5V0E2Gc

bucketofcrud12 2 Builds 1 point 4 days ago

hmm, thats interesting. I suppose marketing and reality are so commonly two different things.

mark5916 1 point 4 days ago

Yeah, using double the inductors and calling each of that a phase seems to be very convenient for marketing purposes.

Because Gigabyte could just use half the inductors for the CPU and just make them bigger or whatever. But that wouldn't look good to the eye. lol

And other board manufacturers does that too. Like ASRock for example.

This board seems to be a 9 phase board.

https://www.asrock.com/MB/AMD/Fatal1ty%20B450%20Gaming%20K4/index.asp

In reality it uses 3 phases for the CPU VCC and another 3 phases for the SOC.

The thing is, ASrock uses double the inductors for the CPU phases and if you add all this, you get 9 inductors as a total.

But these double inductors are running in parallel, so 2 inductors are used for each CPU phase, thus making the real CPU phases to be 3 and not 6!

So, that's not a 6+3 =9 phase board, but just a 3+3 =6 phase board.

And if you don't use an APU, the 3 SOC phases are useless.

So you end up with 3 CPU phases and that's it. lol

But you can still overclock an 4 or 6 core processor until a point even with a 3 phase board.

For a budget build with an R2600 for example, this would be a good board if you can get it for cheap. :-P

bucketofcrud12 2 Builds 1 point 4 days ago

wow, I didnt realize just how off some of these are. I havent even thought to look up my own motherboard, a Z390 Aorus Pro Wifi (advertised) as 12+1 phase. maybe I'll look into that claim and see if that's even accurate.

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Gilroar 1 Build 2 points 4 days ago

Depends on how much voltage is needed to reach 4ghz on your specific chip.

Once you start putting too much voltage through the design Gigabyte uses on AM4 the voltage control goes to hell and you get nasty high spikes well past unsafe ranges which causes unstable overclocks (1.4v can spike to 1.6v too often and even 1.35v pushes into unsafe ranges).

On that boards the changes they made from the older models didn't get rid of their downsides. (They added an additional low side mosfet and choke with no other changes.)

UltraNoob123 submitter 1 point 4 days ago

So do you recommend that I get another board? I will probably need to use about 1,35v for 4ghz

Gilroar 1 Build 1 point 4 days ago

The board quality is only half the problem 2600 is the worst of the Ryzen production currently. So I would say it's more a coin toss to hit that speed at that voltage since we have seen anything from 1.2v-1.4v needed for 4ghz.

Try it on your chip and see if it holds a stress test for several hours (4+ minimum) if not and you can't get 3.9ghz@1.35v then just leave it at stock.

UltraNoob123 submitter 1 point 4 days ago

Why is it the worst? It does better than the 1700x on single core performance

Gilroar 1 Build 1 point 4 days ago

Why is it the worst? It does better than the 1700x on single core performance

1700X is a first generation part though.

A second generation Ryzen only ends up as a 2600 if it fails to be anything better so the silicon quality varies widely.

mark5916 1 point 4 days ago

...can spike to 1.6v

I don't think it will ever go that high.

The CPU will throttle way sooner than this.

Gilroar 1 Build 1 point 4 days ago

The CPU only throttles if the temperatures pass the time limit without the cooler bringing them back under control.

Spikes like that have been very common on Gigabyte boards in particular up to the Z390 changes for a few years now for both AMD and Intel products.

mark5916 1 point 4 days ago

The CPU only throttles if the temperatures pass the time limit without the cooler bringing them back under control.

No processor can run at 1.6 Volts unless you use Liquid Nitrogen as a cooling solution.

Spikes like that have been very common on Gigabyte boards

Spikes at 1.6 Volts?

And the processor does still work? lol

Gilroar 1 Build 1 point 4 days ago

No processor can run at 1.6 Volts unless you use Liquid Nitrogen as a cooling solution.

Not for long no but spikes are not long.

Spikes at 1.6 Volts?

And the processor does still work? lol

Ever dig into why so many people were having issues with Gigabyte the 7700/7700K and high temperatures??? Intel TIM was allowing people to see the voltage spikes easier.

Everything using a PWM controller can do the same since it is pulsing the power so the closer you push things to limits with a wider signal the more over spikes you get.

And 400 series only added the ability for the PWM controller to report its current capacity to the chip otherwise they are unchanged from 300 series.