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Sinsure

11 months ago

I am planning to upgrade my computer with the purpose of streaming and gaming off a single machine. My budget for doing so would be around 2200$ give or take(given good opinions could push higher). Im looking for a build that would be utilizable in the lian li 011 dynamic as thats a case that was gifted to me by a friend. Any info would be of great help as I run into alot of conflicting opinions with little reasoning. So please with your part list if you could explain why I would appreciate it. This will be my first pc build centered around streaming so it is a foreign topic to me.

Comments

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Does the budget include peripherals (display/keyboard/mouse/speakers/etc)?

Operating System required?

If you have already have a display or planning on purchasing one, whats the display resolution and refresh rate? This will help to determine the best GPU fit within budget!

Which regional currency (USA, CAD, AUS, ETC)?

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

I have peripherals and the budget for the monitor is seperate. Im going to be going for a 144hz monitor at 1920 1080 or 2560 by 1440 and USD

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Assuming you're favouring the larger screen and sharper image 1440p resolution over 1080p, i've gone for the RTX 2080 card! Now it's a question of how much you are willing to splurge out for 1440p panel with all the enthusiast bells and whistles (27" sweet spot, Gsync, 144hz refresh rate, ....and if preferable IPS, etc)

The CPU selection (9900K) is very simple. Although over-priced, it is the best gaming chip currently available and easily "fits your $2200 budget". With 8 cores + 16 thread hyperthreading, gaming and streaming simultaneously will be nicely streamlined without compromising performance either way. The Ryzen 2700X although trailing behind, offers fantastic value for equally functional performance for the tasks in question. Should you opt for the cheaper AMD route you also have the AM4 SOCKET upgrade path, which is compatible with AMD's next gen CPUs.

Wasn't sure which 011 variant you have from the Li Lian line-up of cases - added one as a precursor hence feel free to amend.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $538.90 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Corsair - H150i PRO 47.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $149.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard MSI - MPG Z390 GAMING PRO CARBON ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $193.34 @ B&H
Memory Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $109.99 @ Newegg
Storage Crucial - MX500 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $134.99 @ Adorama
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card MSI - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB DUKE Video Card $779.99 @ B&H
Case Lian-Li - PC-O11DW ATX Full Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit $126.59 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2173.67
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-26 22:35 EST-0500

Any info would be of great help as I run into alot of conflicting opinions with little reasoning.

There's always a lot to cover hence it would be easier if you can check the recommended spec and ask questions where concerns arise. Feel free to ask anything and everything.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

if you dont mind me asking what makes the i9 such a great choice and when u compare it to say tr 1950x what makes you say 9900k?

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

The TR (1950X) is generally slow in terms of "single core clock rate performance" but makes up for it's higher core count which is very effective for tasks which are optimised for multi-core processing (eg. higher resolution streaming, rendering, transcoding, encrypting, modelling, etc etc ~workstation-grade job lots). Slower single cores generally means a slower system and having more cores means faster rendering times for specific tasks only.

On the other end - Premium consumer-end gaming chips with lower core-counts but "faster single core performance" are best for gaming purposes or general day to day productivity. Since games are optimised to only use 4 or 6 cores at best, the faster the cores the better the gaming performance. Only a handful of games are using 6 cores and the vast majority are tailored for 4-core utilisation only. Hence more cores for gaming will have a zero/negligible effect on performance gains.

EXAMPLE - At our partners work place we have the 1950X (2 machines) which is primarily used for heavy video editing or batched image rendering (amongst other multi-core purposeful tasks). The chips performance ties in very nicely for the purpose at hand. But...at home I have a 4-core 8th gen i7-7700K (Oc'd to very fast single core 5.0Ghz perf) for gaming which is the better fit for higher FPS performance in games. The i7 ties in beautifully for demanding games on top settings and outperforms the 1950X by a clear mile! Both setups do a great job for their intended purpose of use and swapping these chips around wouldn't make any sense and will end up immensely under-performing!

For you, since you are gaming and streaming simultaneously, the idea is to find the best "balance" between the 2 platforms without compromising performance on either side. That brings us to the i9-9900K (or AMD 2700X) which maintains top notch "single core speeds" and more than adequate "multi-core threaded performance" for streaming (with a total of 8 physical cores + 16 threads).

The balance is not an absolute prerequisite for the simultaneous 2-way support of gaming and streaming but more in line with "getting your moneys worth" with everything running smoothly and matching the spends overall performance experience. Where we can compromise on the balance is if the idea is to stream 4K content using higher quality presets/configs (although 1080p being the standard for the vast majority) but that will come at a cost of taxing gaming performance for buyers who are eager to score higher FPS returns using 144hz panels.

I hope that makes sense!

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

That makes good sense. My goal is not 4k streaming it is the regular 1080 . Your answer was very in depth and i appreciate it. I want to get the best quality gaming and streaming . Thank you!

  • 10 months ago
  • -2 points

For a streaming pc i will go for 1950x or wait for zen 2 to come out. For steaming, video recording, and video editting a strong multi thread cpu are needed because the software are optimized for multi threads not single thread. More games coming out are optimized for multi threads. Single thread are more or less gone in the near future.

A lot of people are behind in cpu technology here. They are stuck with Intel because Intel dominated for so many years. Ryzen is much better than intel. With 7nm coming out for amd, intel will be so far behind it will take a decade for intel to catch up. Intel 10nm in 2020 can't complete with amd.

If you can wait for six months ryzen 7nm is a game changer. I won't be surprised if the new 7nm threadripper will have at least 24 cores and 5.0ghz. The 3800 and 3850 are rumors to have 16 cores and at least a clock speed of 5.1ghz with superior single and multiple threads speed.

I've been delaying my upgrade for over 2 years to get 7nm cpu. If the threadripper version comes around the same time as the 3850 I probably spend the extra money on the threadripper. I'm estimating the cpu,ram, and motherboard will run me over $1500. That's all i need tho for my upgrade.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I just wanted to thank you myself, I found this comment/ post and fell in love with this build, everything Sinsure was looking for is the same as me. My only question is the compatibility notes suggest that - The motherboard M.2 slot #1(and #2) shares bandwidth with a SATA 6.0 Gb/s port. When the M.2 slot is populated, one SATA 6.0 Gb/s port is disabled. - and wanted to make sure that wouldn't be an issue when building and if the ports are actually disabled or if the are ways to get around said problem. Thank you im a noob with this and your later comment really helped me as well!

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

It has to be that way as ur taking up the memory for that slot. It is not an issue just pcpartpicker telling u if u use an m.2 not to plug anything into that sata port because it wont work! Im glad this was able to help you! I got ALOT of help from live_ammo and he really helped me finalize it.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah he's been super helpful. Also thank you for helping me find a really cool case, I found it through you and i'm totally getting it for my build!

  • 10 months ago
  • 2 points

Hi Codeman1,

M.2 form factor SSDs share the same lanes with 1 or 2 SATA ports. Populating these M.2 headers would in return disable those SATA ports (in other words unusable). This is normal with all current motherboards which employ the newer M.2 form factor. You have nothing to worry about as most Mid-ATX motherboards come with 6 SATA ports. All you need to do is check with the Motherboard manual to see which of those ports are disabled and plug in any additional SATA devices in the remaining 4 available SATA ports.

If you have a number of SATA devices (SSDs, HDs, etc) which exceed the number of ports available, you have the option of taking an 8-SATA port board.

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

I get it now, than you sir!

  • 10 months ago
  • 1 point

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $538.90 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Corsair - H150i PRO 47.3 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $149.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - Z390 Taichi ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $229.98 @ Newegg
Memory Team - Night Hawk RGB 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $124.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $89.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $59.89 @ OutletPC
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB Black Video Card $698.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Lian-Li - PC-O11DW ATX Full Tower Case $0.00
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $59.99 @ Newegg
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit $126.59 @ Amazon
Case Fan Corsair - HD120 RGB 3-Pack w/Controller 54.4 CFM 120mm Fans $73.57 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $2207.78
Mail-in rebates -$55.00
Total $2152.78
Generated by PCPartPicker 2018-12-26 23:59 EST-0500

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