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Intel 14nm Processors Facing Shortages and Increasing Prices... Again.

Comments

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

except i5-8600K, there is plenty of that, provantage have a quantity of over 4500 https://www.provantage.com/service/searchsvcs?QUERY=i5-8600k&SUBMIT.x=0&SUBMIT.y=0

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

hmmm that may push back the Release of the 9th Series Intel CPUs?

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Intel delaying.

AMD losing GF as their primary supplier.

Its turning into a bad year again for PC's

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

As long as AMD was stuck in the "cheap chip" game with low performance for low price then GF was a good fit for AMD. When AMD is making designs capable of competing head to head with Intel (and hopefully nvidia) then GF merely holds AMD back with substandard processes (it might be cheap, but higher performance would justify a much higher price than the cost of the wafer).

It all comes down to the effects of the wafer agreement and what it says/how it is negotiated.

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

then GF merely holds AMD back with substandard processes (it might be cheap, but higher performance would justify a much higher price than the cost of the wafer).

GF uses Samsung processes which only held AMD back compared to Intel.

TSMC tends to have a little less problems at higher frequencies but they also trade efficiency and area to get that higher clock speed, let alone their current "7nm" is a area shrunk 10nm like Samsung and GF 8nm processes.

So moving to them for newer products is more marketing hype then actual gain from GF 12nm LP.

It all comes down to the effects of the wafer agreement and what it says/how it is negotiated.

TSMC has finite production and now they just added more demand for their products with no new production scheduled to be volume ready before 2020.

Apple will still have the benefit of prefered status which leaves the rest of the major players QUALACOM/NVidia/AMD/Intel/Mediatek/ASMEDIA and so on with tighter supply then ever.

  • 17 months ago
  • 0 points

AMD losing GF as their primary supplier.

They are not losing GF as a supplier. They are not going to be working with them on 7nm products, but will still be working with GF for existing nodes.

7nm was planned with TSMC from the onset (or at least a fair bit of time with recent articles suggesting acceleration in timetables rather then the opposite: https://hexus.net/tech/news/industry/121508-amd-accelerates-7nm-process-adoption/ ) with future products envisaged to be on 7nm, EPYC, GPU's etc. I have no doubt with that relationship, process, knowledge with the TSMC 7nm process, that further products could not be put on the process either.

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

AMD is still tied to GF by their Wafer Supply Agreement, and they had preferential customer status with them so they were able to always get bumped to the head of the line and get the best pricing.

TSMC only gives Apple preferential status now so both AMD and NVidia will be fighting for spots in production and trying to get better pricing.

The only other options they have is Intel and Samsung but both are not going to give them favorable options on production slots.

GF might have held AMD back but at the same time they allowed them to purchase wafers for cheaper then they could elsewhere, and the existing nodes are going away within the next year or so AMD says.

  • 17 months ago
  • 0 points

AMD is still tied to GF by their Wafer Supply Agreement, and they had preferential customer status with them so they were able to always get bumped to the head of the line and get the best pricing.

I fully imagine we will see an adjustment here. As far as I recall the agreement also included 7nm process. If said process is dropped by GF, no doubt the contact / agreement will be up for negotiations. Evidently even in light of this (or with AMD knowing GF were to drop said process) AMD crunched the numbers and started collaboration with TSMC.

TSMC only gives Apple preferential status now so both AMD and NVidia will be fighting for spots in production and trying to get better pricing.

Absolutely, yet at this point in time it seems to AMD its not an issue and they have taken a collaborative approach. Evidently AMD started this approach knowing full well their position in the pecking order.

GF might have held AMD back but at the same time they allowed them to purchase wafers for cheaper then they could elsewhere, and the existing nodes are going away within the next year or so AMD says.

I imagine AMD is half decent at future planning. If they plan to transition entirely to 7nm at TSMC, no doubt they will make forecasts and agreements accordingly.

TLDR: For me, don't see how this year on the CPU side has been anything buy positive for AMD with thier new lineup and CPU. I personally do not know of many people saying this year has turned into a bad year for PC's in regards to AMD on CPU side. GPU side AMD is meh, but that started from the onset with Vega regardless. Similarly AMD's share price is only going up so evidently the market seem to have some confidence in AMD, same cannot be said of Intel.

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

TLDR: For me, don't see how this year on the CPU side has been anything buy positive for AMD with thier new lineup and CPU. I personally do not know of many people saying this year has turned into a bad year for PC's in regards to AMD on CPU side.

This year yes but next year they will no longer have the manufacturing capacity that they were able to call on without interuption and planned on having in the future in order to make their chips as cheaply as they have so far.

Puts them pretty much in the same boat as Intel now with not being able to call on the production needed to fulfill demand considering the capacity Intel has lost switching over to 10nm.

It doesn't take much interuption in supply to massively change pricing for either side and this is likely going to hurt both sides no matter how much planning is done. As well as cutting into production capacity for NVidia since they will be using the same foundry.

  • 17 months ago
  • 0 points

If we are talking about next year, then yes they will lose some flexibility. Evidently they have crunched the numbers and feel its a risk worth taking.

My primary comments were in regards to your initial comments of:

Intel delaying.

AMD losing GF as their primary supplier.

Its turning into a bad year again for PC's

AMD are moving to a new supplier but they have not lost GF, rather GF have dropped a fab process. Similarly this year is not a bad year, at least for AMD and even next year, I expect they will be okay, however that is not a given. Guess we will see next year

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Intel 14 nm—————again.

Yup, nothing new

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

it should also be noted. the amount of money lost due to wafer issue with gf. awhile back to.

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

Did you read the semi-accurate article about how HP-Enterprise is suggesting Epyc as an alternative to Xeons because of the supply problem?

  • 17 months ago
  • 0 points

Did you read the semi-accurate article about how HP-Enterprise is suggesting Epyc as an alternative to Xeons because of the supply problem?

This one?

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