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8700k Memory speeds?

DazzCee
  • 21 months ago

Whats the best/right memory speed to aim for in a gaming build. The Intel chips dont "need" the higher clocked speeds of a Ryzen chip, but whats a sweet spot? I dont wanna go out and get 3200+ if im only gonna see 1% performance increase from 2400

Thanks xx

Comments

  • 21 months ago
  • 0 points

Unfortunately that graph tells us nothing about the overall effect on the system.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Is there a person/website with benchmarks for every single (or the most common) MOBO-RAM-CPU combinations? I would be interested, looking for something like this for long now. With single and dual channel RAM benchmarks would be nice, too.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

If only! I think userbenchmark was supposed to be something like that, but without some sort of vetting it's very hard to trust the results.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

userbenchmarks isn't very accurate. I've tested the same system multiple times only to get many different results. Of course, simple things like background tasks, how much data you have on your drives, monitoring software, etc, can skew the scores of those tests. The best thing you can really do is look at cpu and ram speed benchmarks. I know ryzen in general has a lot due to it's performance scaling with faster ram speeds. As far as i'm aware, that performance gain isn't as noticeable for intel stuff. There will be gains with faster ram speeds but it's not as significant and important (mainly in normal day usage and gaming circumstances). As for motherboard, I'm not sure if different motherboards really give much performance benefits. I know there are numbers from reviews like tom's hardware, where they'll provide benchmark comparisons for motherboards (same cpu and ram sticks), but those numbers are so similar, that I doubt the motherboard will affect much in terms of performance.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I can only tell from my own experience that the difference between CL15 2133 and CL15 3000 (same RAM, without and with XMP profile) was like 6 frames in Battlefield 1 (Intel machine GTX 1070 1080p high settings) ... but 114 or 120 fps wasn't an issue for me.

  • I'd say in general:
  • better have 2 than 1 stick
  • CL15 or lower with DDR4
  • the higher the better, but not higher than 3200
  • Intel is fine with 2133 2400 2666

please correct if something is horribly wrong there

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Ram speed mainly helps in stuff like video rendering and what not. For gaming, ram speeds does near nothing. Linus tech tips did a video and concluded that 2666MHz was a "sweet" spot, but honestly, given how s***ty ram prices have been (and still are a bit) compare to what they used to be, id say get what even module works for you in terms of price and gb size.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I believe this is accurate if at stock speeds. I saw a video that showed more like a 5-10% change in fps if the 8700k was OC'ed. (in some games)

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

This was tested with an OC'd chip with different ram speeds? Would you happen to have a link to this video?

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

I think this is the one I saw before: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pD7Rlhpba6E

also just found this one which is showing a difference even at stock speeds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pGr68KoSy50

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

Between 2166MHz vs 3866MHz you'll notice a difference, because yes, ram speeds can help with fps, but it is smally incremental (2133 vs 2400 vs 2666 vs etc). As you saw in the second video, between the 3000MHz and 3200MHz, fps difference was very minimal. You're better off getting more fps by limiting a taxing setting. Of course you can also win back those fps by simply overclocking your ram, but onlu if you find that worth it.

  • 21 months ago
  • 1 point

2800 and up doesn't show much performance scaling except in a few outliers. 2400 and down shows some meaningful drops in performance in many workloads. 2666 is the transition point and minimum sweet spot.

With that said, if you overclock the 8700K, then that "minimum" 2666 RAM speed to get into the minimal scaling territory moves up a notch or 2 in many workloads.

There's almost always a 3000 kit on sale for like $10 more than the cheapest kit you'll find, so just go with something like that if you're looking for best value.

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