Description

To live up to the name, this machine is nearly completely silent. This is my first PC Build since I am switching from the Mac after over 20 years. I needed a machine for Visual Effects, Editing, and Post Production work. I decided to build my first machine to really throw myself into the PC. I was seriously nervous while building this, but everything worked out really well. Planning took much longer than expected, and I had several returns/exchanges until I got everything I needed. In the beginning of the build, I tried using a Be Quiet Dark Rock Pro 4 but it didn't clear the RAM, so I went with the Corsair H100i Pro, although a H115i Pro might have been a better choice.

Since I'm building a workstation instead of a gaming rig, I decided on the X299 series 9900X. Lower cores and higher clock speed. I needed the options like more PCIe Lanes & expanded RAM. I'm not looking to overclock.

The GPU was the big purchase and what I built the computer around. I needed an Nvidia card so I might as well just got for the biggest one.

The Motherboard is pretty fantastic. This one seemed to have the features that I needed and came with a Thunderbolt 3 card which I needed anyway. I really like how there's 3 onboard MVNe slots and it also comes with a PCI card that I can install an additional 4 more. Waiting for prices to drop a bit before loading them up.

The Be Quiet Dark Base 900 is an extremely versatile case, and gave me the flexibility to rearrange the case if need be (and I did 4 times before making the default set up to work). While my Motherboard is an E-ATX board, it doesn't require the inverted HDD carriage or the E-ATX posts since it's not full sized E-ATX. this allowed for better placement of the Radiator in the front of the case. I would have liked to get the 900 Rev 2, but I didn't want a glass side door as it will be under my desk right near my feet and chair.

After completing the build, I realized that perhaps I should have chosen a different case due to issues I had with radiator sizes, placement, and ventilation. Sure it has a lot of places to put radiators and fans, but some of the layout design confuses me. the Documentation states that the case can take a 280mm radiator (but not a 240mm) on the bottom to the case, but my PSU covers half of that space (See Images). The PSU sits in a sled a couple inches off the back of the case so it can be moved around for different case arrangements, but I think the space in the back is the same amount needed in front of the PSU for a 280mm radiator to fit. I don't know how you can put a 280mm radiator there unless you put the PSU outside the case. I also did purchase the PSU shroud (since only the Rev2 comes with it) and once I put it on, the side door was very difficult to put on and take off. Turns out that one of the raised screw holes on the PSU Shroud is directly behind one of the bottom side panel slots and rubs against the panel latch keeping the door from opening and closing easily (See Images). A bit of a design flaw. In the end, I'm happy with the case.

I ended up going with both watercooled CPU and GPU AIOs because of the sound level of air-cooled systems. For years I've had machines that sounded like jet engines while I work and I was sick of it. The AORUS 2080ti Waterforce is nearly silent. The radiator is position as push/pull in the front intake for maximum cooling. It took up most of the room for the drive bays, but I was able to reduce my internal storage down to 2 3.5" drives and rely on an external RAID system for vast storage. I Raided my SSDs together for a fast source folder and the larger HDD for long term storage and back up.

Update After extensive testing and real world usage, I decided to switch my configuration a bit. I put the CPU AIO radiator in the front in Push/Pull and the GPU radiator on the top or the case. This immediately dropped my CPU temps by a LOT and the machine is even quieter than before under heavy loads. I also added a Corsair Commander Pro to the mix to help with fan control and added 2 more Temperature Sensors; one for ambient and another for exhaust temps. The case fans are running at 100% because, for some reason, the Commander Pro won’t control them. Kinda frustrating but the fans are nearly silent anyway, so no big deal. I also unraided my SSDs and keep them as separate sources, one for Client Jobs, one for personal jobs and Experiments, and the 3rd as a cache drive.

Comments

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

This is a fantastic example of something i think should come back to pcpp which is performance > looks. And if you can achieve silence aswell thats incredible. What a machine. +1 :)

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! I didn't want to make a computer that is a work of art, I needed a computer to help me make art.

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Absolute ******* beast!! Love it.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Neato build! Do you think I could get away with the Noctua NS15-type AIO air cooler? I'm running an 8700K @4.5 GHz for a Pro Tools system build with an RX-580 w/64 GB RAM.

My normal temps while running Pro Tools is 45-52°C while maxing-out rebuilding a -huge- Lightroom 6 catalog with some GPU help.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

If you're running an 8700K, then your board layout will be different since my build is a x299 board. I don't know if the Noctua will fit or not, I can say that this Corsair RAM is really tall. I really don't care If it has LEDs on it, but it had the best Clock Speed / Latency / price point for my build.

  • 6 months ago
  • 2 points

Is there any other case thats compatible with this build?

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

There's plenty out there, but I'd say the Fractal-design R6 would be a great one. It's the original case I wanted to use for this build. Corsair has some great cases for this type of set up as well.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Only thing i dislike about this build is that its RGB in a case with NO WINDOW! :D

  • 6 months ago
  • 0 points

That's true. I'm not big on LEDs. Everything just comes with them already installed. I turned them all to register their component's temperature so I can see quickly if there's a cooling issue. Mostly green, and a little yellow here and there.