Description

Air Cooled Ryzen. Customized Frame. Slim Top Flow Configuration.

The build is named "Bridge 4". Inspired by the Stormlight Archives book series.

Parts include:

CPU: Ryzen 1700, Overclocked

MB: MSI X370 Titanium

PSU: Seasonic Prime 750w Titanium

GPU: Sapphire R9 Fury, unlocked to Fury X

Ram: Crucial Ballistix 16gb 3466 mhz

Hard Disk: Intel 750 400gb x2

Case: AeroCool Dreambox

Fans: Noctua Redux

CPU Cooler: Noctua C14

The case frame assembly is customized. I added certain key pieces from different brands, like a motherboard support tray from Caselabs, and a slim I/O Pcie back panel from Danger Den and Puget Systems. I also modded the HDD hot swap cage by punching a series of exhaust holes at the back side panel and attaching a 120mm exhaust fan for HDD cooling.

Highest valid overclock is 4.1ghz and 3333 ram. But since I use air cooling, I downclock to 4.0 and 3200 ram for stress and benchmark testing. What's really great about this CPU is that if I downclock just a little bit to 3.8ghz, it only needs 1.22v.

Passmark Rating: 5,916.

CPUz: 20,259 multithreaded.

:)

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Comments

  • 30 months ago
  • 5 points

You really the lottery with that cpu! Nice build.

  • 30 months ago
  • 3 points

uhh.. "You really the lottery with that cpu! Nice build." I think you mean "You really won the lottery with that cpu! Nice build." Don't mean to offend you in any way, I'm just chiming in.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 30 months ago
  • 3 points

Cause people

  • 29 months ago
  • 1 point

Cause capitalism. jk

  • 30 months ago
  • 4 points

Since you are the first one that has the Dreambox, tell us about the pros and cons of this case.

  • 30 months ago
  • 5 points

Pros:

1) You can build a truly unique and customized case. You can use clear panels or aluminum mesh to finish enclosing your case.

2) There are different ways to mount things, as long as you are creative and explore different methods. Like you can insert screws upside down in the grooves and lock them into place with nuts. Nylon 6-32 screws work great because you can bend the head of the screws into the grooves and use the screws to mount things like fans.

3) The measurements are very accurate and they all fit together great once you figure out the right combination of parts to use.

4) The components are robust and good quality.

There are also some Cons:

1) Time consuming and you need patience. There are a LOT of screws, so try an electric screwdriver otherwise your wrists will ache from all the screw turning.

2) The parts included are just barely enough quantity and you can't make it too complicated or you will run out of parts.

3) It is a lot of work to take apart and rebuild sections if you need to modify or correct something. If you do have to take apart joint sections, just loosen and don't remove the screws, then pull the rods apart. Leaving the loose screws in place saves you time when putting back.

Overall the experience of building with this case is very rewarding.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the heads up, the case looks promising. Maybe this DIY type of chassis will become a thing for other manufacturers as well.

  • 30 months ago
  • 3 points

This case is genius! Only problem i had, from 20 pics.. I still cant figure it out the whole build looks like

  • 30 months ago
  • 0 points

Just focus on pic#1 (front) and pic#9 (back) :)

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Crazy to hit 4.1 on the 1700 on air! Build well done

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Never seen anything like this before. All I can say is, damn, that's really nice! Definite +1 :)

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

1+

For being the 5th Comment.

And that awesome gorgeous build! Where can I buy the Case?

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

I bought the case at Amazon :)

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Hot damn, you're taking Intel to the cleaners with this rig!

HOLY SMOKES, LORD GABEN SMILES UPON YOU!!

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice my man

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Strength Before Weakness!

  • 30 months ago
  • 2 points

Journey before destination!

Hey check out my last year's stormlight build ;)

https://pcpartpicker.com/b/yrZ8TW

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Boiii u one lucky man, 4116 Mhz is verry nice :D

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks all!

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm confused, why not get the samsung 950 pro 512gb?

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

The Intel 750 ssd was free. It was a gift :) otherwise I would have used a faster single sided M2. The 2nd Intel 750 was just me messing around with trying a pair. I also like the look of the PCie SSD, as well as the heatsink that keeps it cool at only 27C max during load. The BPX M2 I tested reached 92C and throttled. Thats too hot for me. Samsung M2 might maintain temperature better than BPX though. But the Intel 750 will still run cooler.

I use one Intel 750 as primary drive, and the second for daily differential backups using Macrium software. I also have an M2 as a spare disk.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 well done

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Most creative build I have seen yet, very well thought out. Definite A+ for your time and effort.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice RIG dude I really love the chassis it looks like it has a great balance of form and function :)

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

What is that above the power supply looking really cool

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

It is a Hard Drive Hot Swap Enclosure. Brand is IstarUsa.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

All of this looks awesome. By the way, how much does the GPU cost?

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

I bought the Fury in April 2017 before the mining boom. $174 Used, on Ebay ;) then I unlocked the Bios to a Fury X.

But this GPU is expensive to buy now. Best to wait for the new Vega GPU and wait for other cards from AMD or NVIDIA to stabilize in pricing.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

That is a very good price. What kind of things are you going to run? And what does it run it at?

By the way, the benchmarks were very impressive.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

I use it for home office and photo editing. As far as games, currently I play Witcher 3 at 1440p 2k. With a mix of Ultra and High settings I can maintain 60-70 fps. I also tried a GTX1070 which is a more expensive card, and it runs 70-80fps with the same settings. I use a Benq 60hz monitor, so the Fury is more than adequate and a better price.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

hey, i dig the rig. especially the dream box. how loud is it though? like a humming with that noctua? i see you have a few fans for the oc so i'm assuming it may be more than a hum.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Its actually not very noisy. My PWM settings run the fan at 30% up to 50C temperature. Then only when it gets hotter than 50C do the fans start to slowly speed up. The CPU cooler also has only 1 fan.

Its the hard drives at the front sometimes makes the noise. I had to find quiet hard drives.

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

that's crazy. nice build man

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Wow. Great work. Looks exhaustively time consuming, but you ended up with a great looking machine.

Kudos man! +1

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice build! I hadn't heard of the Dreambox before this build, very cool! If I could make one request though it would be a picture slightly stepped away from the case on both the front and back, so that way it could be easier to see the whole build.

All in all very nice!

  • 24 months ago
  • 1 point

I know this was posted months ago, but I had to give it a plus one simply because of the Stormlight Archives reference. Also a really great build! Strength before weakness.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! You’ll like my previous build then with the Knights Radiant symbol https://pcpartpicker.com/b/yrZ8TW

Currently working on version 2 :)

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

What are the temps at 3.8GHz and 4GHz respectively?

Cheers.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

Temps were very good. 3.8 in mid 60s and 4.0 mid 70s with Prime 95. I currently changed my setup now, with different MB and cooler. But i believe those were the temps. 1st generation Ryzen is not limited by temps, it just hits a wall and wont go past once u hit a certain overclock limit.

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

I am actually going to build this as my first computer and for brother in law. I bought the motherboards when it went on sale and I came here for ideas based around the motherboards. I was wondering if any parts could be replaced with different ones on this build or if some where out of date (not necessarily), last season.

One of the other reasons I went with the build is that the total price on here is reasonable for me but it doesnt include 3 items. Those parts are expensive.. but I'm going to keep to my word.

Also, I wanted to know is that if one day you were to sell it how much this build be? Ps. I'm probably going to ask you a lot of questions later as I accumulate more parts.

  • 13 months ago
  • 2 points

Hi, most of the parts or brands have other alternatives as long as they are compatible.

The motherboard and CPU are the important foundations that must match. For example a Ryzen CPU needs to fit to a motherboard with the AM4 socket. Just check each part to make sure they are compatible.

This case (Aerocool Dreambox) is hard to recommend to first time pc builders. Its very time consuming to build. It is also not very stable - more of like a hobby project. If you need a stable and safe computer, buy a traditional enclosed case.

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  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks!

[comment deleted]
  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

No. This case involves more difficulty because you have to design your own layout from scratch and assemble section by section and it can look different depending on your design. Whereas Thermaltake is a traditional case with a set layout with the frame mostly pre assembled. And you install parts to it. They have a similar open frame look though. It is helpful to look at various reviews for each case you are interested in.

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