Description

I started looking into this build a good few months ago and with a recent visit to the USA (I live in the UK) and the benefit of EVGA,Intel and Corsair offering international warranty I managed to save a good few hundred pounds by getting the GPU, Processor and RAM over there due to the $ > £ exchange rate.

So the build was for myself and mainly aimed at a gaming. I also work as a games programmer so wanted a rig that was great for programming too.

Only a couple of pictures at the moment, but I will take more once I get everything properly installed and fasten it all back up.

If you have any questions, don't hesitate to comment and ask!


Choice Explanation:

CPU: Pretty renown for being the flagship i7 so decided to go with it for this build.

CPU Cooler: I'm definitely not against non-water based CPU coolers and in a lot of reviews heatsinks such as the Noctua's actually out perform the AIO water coolers. However, I wanted this rig to look the part too and I think it looks much nicer without a fat heatsink sat there. Obviously the radiator is up top, but It's much more aesthetically pleasing. I went for a 105 due to the small decrease of temperature in its reviews and larger radiator compared with the h100i. Nothing more to it really.

One thing I will note about this cooler, as there is ALOT of info on the forums about it. People are complaining that the backplate is loose before screwing down the actual cooler. I also noticed this and spent an hour scouring the forums with some saying it should be loose and others trying to say it shouldn't and that Corsair "got it wrong" and it needed fixing with washers. Just to be ABSOLUTELY clear. It IS meant to be loose before screwing down the cooler. I decided to take the plunge and go for it and screw it on and EVERYTHING tightened up perfectly. It is solid as a rock now. People claiming you need washers could be lifting their cooler and maybe making it not make good contact. Do not use washers! Trust the installation manual!

Motherboard: I was probably a day away from ordering the VI Hero when I read the news of the new z97 boards being released and being backwards compatible with 4th gen CPU's. I was also reading that their was a hardware bug in the x79 chipset which intel had issued a fix for. I wasn't sure if any of the VI Hero's being sold were the 2nd revision of them or not so that further strengthened going with the VII. The price is also pretty much the same between the VI and VII.

RAM: Just some decent, pretty, red RAM. Nothing ore to say really.

SSD: The 840 EVO comes up strong in most of its reviews and it fit my budget perfectly so why not?

GPU: I've always skimped on the GPU in my previous builds and didn't want to make the same mistake and end up upgrading it again in 12 months time. Pretty pricey I know, but due to the $ >£ exchange rate I managed to bag this card for ~£450 I think it was. Which is a massive saving compared to the UK market. Like I said earlier too, I've read EVGA offer great support and great warranty. Including their Step Up service. Not that I suspect many cards are planned for the next 3 months that may be an upgrade.

Case: Pictures really don't do this case justice. It is absolute beautiful. The matte finish is gorgeous and it is by far one of the sturdiest, nicest finished cases I've ever had the pleasure of using. The panels(including front and top) are extremely easy to remove and are not fiddly at all. This allows very easy access to the dust shields in order to clean. The fact the PSU is hidden from view means that cable management is a dream and looks absolutely stunning. I cant praise this case enough. It was miles above expectation. Great job NZXT.

PSU: Not amazing, not terrible. Just a pretty decent, renown PSU from Corsair. Plenty of juice for a single 780ti. Would obviously need upgrading if I ever decided to go SLI.

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Comments

  • 73 months ago
  • 2 points

Beautiful looking build! I built mine freshman year of high school which was oh... almost 7 years ago. It was an AMD 9950 BE and I just recently ordered an ASrock mobo and i7 4770k and swapped the crappy nvidia gt 9500 for a Radeon 6850 two years ago.. As soon as I put the new mobo/CPU in I want to get liquid cooling.. was looking into that exact cooling system (wasn't sure if I wanted to do a custom loop or AIO).. but your build has me leaning towards that one!

  • 73 months ago
  • 3 points

Custom loop, ftw.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I think I may just use the stock cooler until I have enough funds/order everything for a custom loop. I just won't OC for a month or two.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

That's what I did at some point. The AIO is definitely the cheaper, maintenance-free option, but custom loops outperform by a mile.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Sadly, that's not as true anymore. Although custom loops can squeeze out more performance (talking about CPUs here) the only reason I'd recommend spending the extra ~2-300 bucks (just for a CPU loop) is for the aesthetics. Other than that, it's hard to recommend a custom loop for the CPU performance.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice build, colour scheme looks really good!

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Love the color scheme! Or maybe its just because I went with a red/black build recently myself. Either way, looking good thus far and I'm interested in seeing more pics.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Looks great! +1

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

You are correct that it does not need washers. It's supposed to be loose until the pump is attached to the backplate through the mobo.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

nice +1, good choice on the mobo, great components!!

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Case with no optical equals crap

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

You and I have a very similar build :) Love the colours!

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Love the build! What red cables did you use?

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Hi. They're the Bit-Fenix Alchemy ones. Really good quality. They really surprised me when they arrived.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks. I've been looking for some good quality cables for my future build

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

The build looks amazing the only thing I'd have done differently is change the renown PSU:

http://www.hardocp.com/article/2013/11/13/corsair_rm750_750w_power_supply_review/9#.U344VyjijIc

Food for thought -

if you paid $122+ for the 750w RM Corsair I'd have picked up a XFX for cheaper and had the reliability of Seasonics high quality guts.

https://pcpartpicker.com/part/xfx-power-supply-p1750bbefx

The thing people don't know is that over the last couple of years Corsair has changed their OEM from a high standard and high quality OEM to either mid level or low budget OEM to an even unknown OEM.

Only very few HX and AX / AX (i) series have stuck with an OEM that has high enough standards to stay true to what use to be known as Corsairs high quality and reliability.

Corsair use to use Seasonic as their OEM for the majority of their products up until about 2 years ago. Now they use Chinawell and Chicony Electronics and still charge the same high end prices for budget low quality guts in their products. Since these changes Corsair has suffered from an increase in RMA% which makes it really difficult for me to trust their PSU's when recommending products to clients.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

I'll admit the PSU was one of the parts I looked into the least. It's funny actually as I think people in general overlook the PSU as a whole. I literally just decided by knowing I wanted one ~7/800w and like you said, people just associate Corsair as being quality.

I guess the main positive I can take away from this is the quote from that first article you linked. At least Corsair seem to have taken note and tried to fix the issues: "This change has been implemented in all RM PSUs produced since mid October. While we honestly believe even extreme users will never run into the issue encountered during HardOCP’s synthetic test, those end users that want to know if their RM can endure HardOCP’s torture test can identify the updated PSUs by a lot code of 1341 or higher."

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

How did you go about installing windows with no optical drive? USB?

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

The installer for Windows 8.1 that you get of the Microsoft website allows you to create an install USB drive. Very easy to do actually. Probably easier than downloading the ISO and burning that.

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

ok I wasn't sure, I was planning on buy the hard disk and installing through that but maybe I'll look into that, just 2 problems I would need a bigger usb (couple Gb short) and it's more expensive

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Thinking about getting that case... but the lack of 5 1/2" bays annoys me

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Gorgeous build, appreciate some good sleeved cables. Good balanced part choices, cable management, and like the style.

Builds like these are what make me love this site. Thanks for contributing!

+1

  • 73 months ago
  • 1 point

Great build mate, enjoy it. +1

  • 72 months ago
  • 1 point

My build is a little like this build, I was just wondering if you guy's think I could make any changes..? I was stuck between choosing water cooling and air cooling. - http://pcpartpicker.com/p/sC9JmG

  • 71 months ago
  • 1 point

How were you able to install Windows on this, since there are no driver bays? I've been picking out parts lately and it looks like I picked the same exact parts you did; minus the PSU and the storage.

  • 70 months ago
  • 1 point

You should have added a mechanical hard drive or two for mass storage.

  • 69 months ago
  • 1 point

I already had a 3TB and 1TB drive in my existing PC that I switched over into this build also.

  • 69 months ago
  • 1 point

OK, that gives space for all your games and other files.

  • 73 months ago
  • 0 points

This should just be the default system build when you come to pcpartpicker for the first time... very cookie cutter but very good performance.