Description

Needed a machine for school to replace my broken Y510P and figured I would go for a desktop this time around and get a cheap laptop or tablet for portable applications. For less than what I paid for my laptop about two years ago, I was able to build Garry and I'm glad I did. I have only played a handful of games on him so far (mainly Fallout 4 and GTA V), but so far he has handled it like a champ. I have not gotten exact temps yet or done any real stress testing, but doing a quick and dirty test with Fallout 4 showed my GPU hitting ~75°C and the CPU averaging ~35-40°C across all four cores with the stock cooler. I will update this when I get an SSD and another 8GB of RAM, but even as it is now this build has far exceeded my expectations and should last me a long time.

I know my RAM doesn't match the rest of my parts (the black sticks sold out right before I bought everything) and my cables are a mess, but I was able to keep them mostly out of the way of the important parts so cleaning it up can wait until upgrade day.

Part Reviews

CPU

Runs cool and quiet on stock cooling and performs wonderfully for gaming and productivity applications. A great chip for the money.

Motherboard

A very nice board to work with. Straightforward layout and enough bells and whistles to keep my build relevant for a while. You cannot go wrong with this board at this price range.

Memory

It's RAM, not much else to say. Hasn't died on me yet. Looks good and comes in different colors if aesthetics are important to you.

Storage

Got one a few days after the initial build and it has performed excellently ever since. No complaints so far.

Storage

Cheap price for a good amount of storage. Runs cool and quiet.

Video Card

A great card if you want the best 1080p experience with as little heat and power consumption as possible. No noticeable performance issues so far and has handled everything I've thrown at it so far with ease at 1080p60 on near max settings. If Nvidia is your preference, you can't go wrong with this card.

Case

A great case for a good price, but it has it's flaws. Mine came with a bent hard drive bracket, the front panel is slightly caved in, and one of my front USB 3.0 ports doesn't work. I will update this once I get a hold of Thermaltake customer support after the holidays. Other than those issues, it was very easy to work in and surprisingly roomy despite it's small measurements. I like the look of it as well and the portability is second only to cases like the Sugo SG13 or NCASE M1, both of which are more expensive than this bad boy. If you want a small case that looks good and don't mind taking a risk, the Core V1 is a good option.

Power Supply

UPDATE (7 months since purchase): Fan started rattling. Started off barely noticeable and got worse over the course of two days. Took it apart (voiding my warranty) and lubricated the bearing in the fan. Noise has been gone ever since.

A relatively cheap but reliable PSU with fully modular cables. What's not to love? The price and performance were right with this unit and I would recommend it to anyone who needs a 500+W PSU. Cables can be stiff and hard to work with, but this can be overcome with a bit of manhandling.

Monitor

A decent monitor for a good price. No HDMI port, only one DVI and one VGA, but it's enough for my purposes right now.

Log in to rate comments or to post a comment.

Comments

  • 54 months ago
  • 3 points

+1 for the Core V1!

  • 54 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! It really is a great case. Just wish their quality control was a bit tighter.

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

how did you oc that cpu pcpp says it is clocked at 3.6ghz

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

That's the max frequency it can reach when turbo boost is activated. I just put it in there to show what it's capable of.

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build, I'm planning on doing mostly the same. Just keep going back and forth on whether or not to get a Z series board (if I wanted to get a K processor later and faster ram now). Definitely look out for a SSD deal and get one to use as a boot drive, it's a world of different (even on my old PC with SATA II).

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

I actually just got an 850 EVO the other day, it's been pretty great so far.

  • 51 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice, I got the same case !

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build. Building a quite similar one soon. Same casing, mobo, processor. Any tips or advice with the mobo?

  • 46 months ago
  • 2 points

It's pretty straightforward, actually, other than the case being a bit cramped compared to most other cases. For mITX it's not bad at all, though. The only non-obvious thing I can really think of is if you are planning on using an M.2 SSD, install it first because it gets blocked by the power supply and partially by the plate the mobo rests on once it's all put together. The hard drive holders are a bit low quality as well (one of mine even came bent but was easily fixable) and they can take a bit of wiggling to install and remove. Other than that, just be careful and it's a piece of cake :)

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

bro how do i OC my 6500 with a gigabyte mobo

[comment deleted]
  • 54 months ago
  • 1 point

The stock cooler, surprisingly! I didn't have high hopes for it, and it is the loudest part of the build, but they worked some sort of magic into Skylake or something because this thing is stone cold. Here are my temps as I type this: http://i.imgur.com/PRbQJFx.png

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

CMIIW, but isn't the Skylake procs doesn't come with a stock cooler?

  • 53 months ago
  • 2 points

I'm pretty sure that's only the K processors that don't come with coolers since you would be using an aftermarket one to overclock.

  • 53 months ago
  • 1 point

The non-K versions still come with them.

[comment deleted by staff]