Description

The parts listed (mostly) came from my first build I completed in November of 2017, for which I used a Fractal Core 1100. The case was okay, definitely cheap with some features I liked, such as a 5.25" bay, but the airflow and cable management were somewhat absent. Several months later, I rebuilt the system in the NZXT H200i, which has the airflow and filters I really like. The case is solid, looks good, and comes with a CAM Smart Device, which is really handy for hooking up fans, as my motherboard only has 1 fan header apart from the CPU fan header. I do miss having the option of an optical disk drive, but I hardly find myself needing one these days, anyway.

Another part that got exchanged was the heatsink, from the Cryorig C7 to the be quiet! Pure Rock Slim. The C7 was pretty loud, so the near silent Slim is pretty welcome here. I do hate that the Slim uses the same mounting solution as stock Intel coolers, but that's my only gripe, really.

The last part to go was the graphics card, which stayed in the new system until just recently; I traded out a STRIX RX 570 for an EVGA 1060 6GB, which I love. The 570 ran quite hot, even at factory stock settings and an aggressive fan curve. While a very capable 1080p high/ultra card, it fell slightly short for 21:9 1080. The 1060 runs very cool, usually peaking at about 62C, and really has no problem with ultrawide gaming.

Part Reviews

CPU

Decent entry-level CPU, but with the release of Coffee Lake, this CPU doesn't really make much sense at this point.

CPU Cooler

As the name suggests, it stays quiet while keeping my i5-7400 under 60C during gaming, for the most part. However, the Intel-cooler style mounting solution is pretty terrible, at least in my experience with it.

Motherboard

Not much to complain about, just a solid board that does what it's supposed to. The AC wifi and m.2 are great features, at least for my needs.

Video Card

So far, this card has been really good for 21:9 1080p gaming. The cooler is beefy and stays quiet, albeit compared only to my previous STRIX 570 that sounded like a plane taking off. Solid card, EVGA makes great products.

Case

This is a very well-built, beautifully minimalistic case. For the price, though, it's expected that it be solidly built. For $130, while it sounds steep for a metal box, if tempered glass, good airflow, RGB, and pretty good included case fans are important to you, I think a good case regarding its value could be made. My only concrete gripe with this case is that the 3.5" drive location is flush with the bottom of the case, which caused issues for me, but may not cause issues for others. Overall, the airflow and subdued aesthetic have made me really like this case.

Power Supply

It's a good-looking, reasonably beefy PSU that should work well in most any modern entry to mid level build. My only real gripe is that the end of the 24-pin connector is really stiff, so it's sort of difficult to work with.

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Comments

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Why did you choose to go with such an expensive motherboard?

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

As far as I know, there's not a way to make that list reflect the prices I paid for my parts, aside from just typing out my own list or something. That being said, I paid roughly $90 at the time that I built the system.

  • 18 months ago
  • 2 points

Thank you for clearing things up, I could have sworn you could change the price in the settings icon next to the part but I'm not sure. I love the build btw, I never mentioned that in my first comment!

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

I think I found what you're talking about now, I'll probably go back in and try to change the prices to what I paid for them. Thanks!

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

how did you install the blue 1TB hard disk? was there enough space?

  • 17 months ago
  • 2 points

There is a dedicated spot for a 3.5" drive, and while the drive itself went in fine, getting power to it was somewhat difficult, as the space between the connectors and the side panel is somewhat narrow, but the drive sits FLUSH with the bottom of the case, which was the main issue I had during installation. My PSU's included SATA power cable has 3 connectors, but they're "upside-down." By that, I mean none of the connectors could plug into the HDD and rest flat with the bottom of the case. To remedy this, I had to buy a single (ugly) SATA extension, but it worked. I'll include a picture of this on the build.

  • 17 months ago
  • 1 point

thanks for the response! very helpful

  • 16 months ago
  • 1 point

Your build encouraged me to get this case since it fits the 240 AIO, the ATX PSU, and the 3.5" Harddrive :). Check my Build! I need your feedback.

  • 18 months ago
  • -3 points

Terrible build. Your motherboard is stupidly expensive and there in no need for a motherboard that expensive in this build. you can get 16 GB of DDR4-3200 memory for the exact same price. It's absolutely ridiculous that you wouldn't cough up an extra $2 for an i5 8400 cpu which would increase over all speeds by 25%. That is an extremely old case and there are better ones for much cheaper. There are better power supplies. You can get a gtx 1060 for at the very most $300 yet the one you chose was $330? Please don't recommend this build to anyone.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Deep breaths, man. If you didn't notice it, I stated that the date for the "original" build was November of 2017 (though I had already bought the cpu and motherboard by September), meaning that Coffee Lake had just come out, and only the Z370 chipset was available at the time, which would have been a bad pairing with the i5-8400. On the topic of motherboards, I didn't pay anywhere close to $300 dollars for the board, I paid around $90, and it had the features that I wanted, so it wasn't a bad deal at all. Most of your criticisms stem from how much I paid for parts, but you have to realize that these prices fluctuate all the time, and don't at all reflect how much I paid for my parts. The RAM didn't cost me $165: it actually cost me almost $200 because the market was much worse several months ago, and believe it or not, it was one of the cheapest kits available at the time. Continuing this theme, I didn't pay $330 for my card, I paid $300. Would I recommend this exact build to anyone? Nope. A Coffee Lake platform can be had at a fair price now with the h310 chipset, and the RAM I do have is rated for a higher speed than my motherboard can run it at (capped at 2400, but to be fair, the 2666 kit was cheaper than the 2400 at the time). That being said, I like my system, and it's not nearly as objectively bad as your criticisms would make it out to be. Calm down, bud.

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  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for your comment, I'm glad the 7400 is getting some love around here. If you do move to a different motherboard for the addition of an m.2 slot, I'd make sure to check what bus the slot runs on. On my board, the m.2 slot actually just runs on the SATA III bus, so while it's not as fast as a PCI-e bus m.2, it's better than nothing. I mostly chose an m.2 drive to cut down on cable clutter, but I'm sure your SSD would be somewhat similar in performance to mine. Anyway, thanks again!

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