Description

It was time to hand down my I5 4590 build to son #1, who then handed down his Phenom II build to son #3. I have been looking forward to the Ryzen release and followed it over the last couple months to make sure most of the bugs are out. It seems pretty stable so I took the leap.

I spent way too much time debating between loud and proud and silent but deadly. I like the look of some of the new tempered glass cases with the RBG shenanigans. But despite all the bells and whistles, I am still a man of simple tastes and prefer cool & quiet. The goal was a small profile design with some higher end components to help eliminate heat and noise.

My take away: An Intel build would have been cheaper and easier to build. The 7700k was about the same price, but the RAM is cheaper, I probably would have gone with a cheaper PSU and the mATX boards are more stable and have better options. That said, I kind of feel like a pioneer with the Ryzen. There are some bugs to work out still, but it's been fun a fun ride so far.

Part Reviews

CPU

What a beast. I've been using it a few months now. It over clocks well and stays pretty cool. It really lets me multitask like a Boss. Took a chance on it right when it came out and it's been very solid. 3.75 GHz @ 1.28v. Has the headroom to get to 4 Ghz, but gets a little toasty. The TPD is only 65 watts.

CPU Cooler

Started off with an older & smaller Noctua u9b that I had laying around. It was nice and the average temps were 40/78c. I swapped in a d15s and temps dropped to 32/68c after 24 hours. It is a truly well engineered hunk of metal. It is huge, but I have no issues with RAM clearance or the 1st PCIe slot. Unlike the older model, this new one is offset a bit and allows for the clearance. WOW. I really debated about going with a hi-end AIO, but I wanted a quieter cooler and the Noctua matches or beats a lot of water coolers out there.

Motherboard

After the BIOS issues were worked out, it's been solid. I spent a lot of time trying to overclock it and it was a real pain in the butt. Once we started seeing better BIOS versions, it really started to do much better. The extra PCI gets blocked by any decent sized GPU. The GPU also covers up the only m.2 spot on the board. Wish there were more fan headers too. I also wish it had a digital output for sound - and that he sound had a better DAC and was powered too. If I were to do it over again, I'd have used the ASRock Pro board. It has a better layout. I like the extra m.2 spot too.

Memory

Very solid. Ryzen recommended and was on the early list for compatibility. It loaded right up to 2933 and then when the bios updated, I got to 3200 via xmp. The timing settings are the best too. I think it'll go higher too, but I ok with leaving good enough alone for now.

Storage

I thought it was kind of pointless to slap a NVMe drive on the board and then handcuff it with SSD or HDD drives. I went big here - less cables, less noise, less heat. One fast little stick is all. 1 TB should meet most of my needs. I use a server for the big stuff, but I may pick up an external usb 3.1 gen 2 drive for extra capacity if I need it. The TB version apparently is faster than it's smaller counterparts too for some reason.

Video Card

I needed something to drive my Freesync monitor at 1440p and the R9 Fury Nitro was the best AMD card out at the time. It was on sale for about $250 last December. At 1440p, its performance is similar to a 1070. This card is massive. Over the top huge. But it is super quiet and most of the time the fans don't even spin. It barely fit the case. I do notice that when it ramps up in a game, the max temp is about 78c. It blows out the side of the card and heats up the case. Those three fans at top speed get pretty loud too. I'm really temped to pick up a hybrid card.

Case

Great case. It is quiet and cool and has a small profile. No window. If the tempered glass version had been out, I would have gone that route perhaps. The cable management is great. The cooling is great. It gives you plenty of space for water cooling if that's your thing. I removed the hard drive underneath the shroud for better air flow. My old R4 was pretty quiet, but I like this smaller version better. I literally have to put my ear against the side to hear if it is on.

Power Supply

The fan doesn't spin most of the time. It's cool and very quiet and extremely stable. It holds my overclock quiet well. It was rated 10/10 on the JonnyGURU site.

Monitor

I've had this a couple years and I've had a love / hate relationship with it. The performance is excellent. There was a scanline issue right down the middle of the screen while running at 144hz that needed to be fixed with a firmware. Unfortunately, it had to be shipped off to get fixed. Other that that, it's been an excellent monitor. The freesync range is a little weird - 35 - 90hz is all, but most AAA games at 1440p don't really exceed that anyways. I like the IPS panel. I like the colors. Whites are good and it's easy to read text. I couldn't go back to a TN panel after using an IPS monitor for a while. I debated about 4k, but I don't think they are ready for prime time yet. This monitor is a gamer.

Keyboard

It's red. It's clicky, but not annoyingly so. Easy to type. No frills - just solid. Metal base is nice. The detachable hand rest is excellent. The newer boards have the fancy rbg stuff going on. Mine just has the red lights with adjustable brightness. The extra USB slot up front is a nice touch. It also comes with some extra metal keys for your gaming controls, but I never hooked them up because I do a lot of typing and don't want the distraction.

Mouse

It's been a really nice mouse. I have larger hands, so it fits me pretty well. I like the cushy sides, but after a while they start to wear down. Now I have a little hole right where I grip the side with my thumb. The side buttons are in a good spot and easy to press, with just enough resistance. The scroll wheel has a nice little click to it - you don't hear it, but you can feel it - it's good feedback. There is also a little button on top that switches the cpi rate. I do wish it had a better connecting cable - it's just a wire. I like the sleeved look some mice have. I'll probably try something else in a little while, but I could see myself coming back to this one.

Comments

  • 32 months ago
  • 2 points

Still not than many Ryzen builds on PCPP +1

  • 32 months ago
  • 1 point

+1 for the Fury, but I have a hardtime believing that it's silent, lol. I think it maybe because how big it is, and expecting it to always be in hyperdrive or something. Beautiful build though. :)

  • 32 months ago
  • 2 points

Actually, this variant of the fury is really, really quiet. I cant hear it rev up whatsoever. The only noise you can hear is its notorious coil whine..

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

I had a little coil whine when I first got it. The whine happened when the card went for max FPS on certain games. MSI Afterburner and Riva Tuner fixed it for me. I set the frame limit to 144hz and there is zero coil whine now.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Yes limiting the FPS eliminates it, that's what I do as well.

  • 32 months ago
  • 1 point

heatsink fans are facing the wrong way. flip them around

  • 32 months ago
  • 1 point

/headslap. I reinstalled them again when the new mobo arrived. I'll double check when I get home. Thanks!

  • 32 months ago
  • 1 point

The AMD Fury trails behind a 1070 by about 30-40% its the Fury X that gets close to a 1070.

  • 32 months ago
  • 1 point

You're right - the 1070 spanks the card at 1080p. At 1440p, it's a lot closer. The Nitro is overclocked from Sapphire and is basically right on par with the Fury X - maybe just a couple frames per second difference.

  • 32 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice build! 470$ on 1tb is abit rough for me, I prefer the 40$ ssd 50$ hd and put 380$ back into my gpu :) can't fault you for over doing it though, I'm guilty of that

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Still waiting for a freesync GPU that will outperform the Nitro Fury. Hoping Vega will be released sometime this year.